The Arts in Aiken: The Ice Bucket Challenge! page 3

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1 September 2014 The Ice Bucket Challenge! page 3 The Arts in Aiken: The Aiken Center for the Arts is Going Strong page and Flourishing: The Aiken Community Playhouse page 18 Old Aiken History: Croft Block page 10

2 contents Intriguing Empowering Entertaining September Features Bella Favorites September 2014, Volume 11, No.6 7 The Filson Academy Invites Bourbon Lovers to Rose Hill for an Education in Whiskey 10 Downtown s Croft Block by Anna Dangerfield 12 Marvelous Misconceptions by Phyllis Maclay 14 The Aiken Center for the Arts Thrives Over 40+ Years by Stephen Delaney Hale 17 Celebrate the Culinary Arts at the ACA 18 All the World s a Stage by Sally Bradley 3 Ciao Bella 4 Bella Buzz/Community Calendar 8 The Flying Foodie: Feta, Blue Cheese and Gongonzola by Chef Belinda 22 Roots & Wings: To Bribe or Not to Bribe by Betts Hunter Gatewood 23 Good Sense Medicine: Why is it So Hard to Lose Weight When Your Hormones Are Not Balanced? by Zoom Heaton 24 Nutrition: A Naturopathic Food Plan for Preventing Diabetes by Cynthia F. Catts 26 Scene Around Town Mailing Address 124 Trafalgar St., SW Aiken, SC Publisher Kathy Huff Cunningham Advertising Kathy Huff 803/ Staff Writers Anna Dangerfield, Phyllis Maclay, Susan Elder, Tony Baughman, Sally Bradley, Stephen Delaney Hale, Karen Guevara Graphic Design Jim Stafford Bella is now online! Want Bella delivered to your mailbox Subscriptions (9 issues per year) are available via U.S. Mail for $30. Send checks payable to: Bella Magazine 124 Trafalgar Street SW, Aiken, SC September 2014 Ad Directory Aiken Center for the Arts A Taste of Wine & Art Aiken Obstetric and Gynecology Associates Aiken Ophthalmology Aiken Regional Medical Centers... 3, 28 AllStar Tents and Events Auto Tech Barbara Sue Brodie Needleworks Chef Belinda Spices Cynthia Catts, RD, LD, Nutrition Therapist Guest Cottage Newberry Opera House Mead Hall Nights of Horseplay by the Aiken Scribblers Oh Schmidt! Shelly Schmidt Photography...22 Ray Massey, Attorney...5. Rose Hill Estate Ruby Masters, Mark Taylor Insurance Shellhouse Funeral Home... 4 Shops on Hayne The Stables Restaurant at Rose Hill TLC Medical Centre The Tailor Shop True Value Hardware...6. Wayne s Automotive & Towing Center...9. WKSX FM Radio The Willcox Hotel, Restaurant, Spa York Cottage Antiques BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

3 Ciao Bella! The Ice Bucket Challenge Kudos to all of you who accepted the Ice Bucket Challenge this summer! You helped the ALS Association raise record amounts of money by doing something fun, easy, and stimulating. (I could not believe how cold that water was!) I must admit that I was a little late coming to the party on this one. With therapy, I m sure I could come up with a good reason. Maybe I was just too busy to pay attention, or maybe it was pure sadness, or perhaps denial. You see, my mother died of ALS. In 1991 she was diagnosed with the disease for which there is no cure and in 1992 she died. Of a cold. For her, that was the tipping point. Something so innocuous as a cold killed her. So simple. For her, so deadly. My Mom My mother, Marian Urban, contracted the type of ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, more commonly known as Lou Gehrig s disease), that affected her chest and throat muscles; this is known as bulbar ALS. She was the odd victim with no history of it in our family, it was a random manifestation. Although she never lost her mobility or the use of her hands, she went through stages where other basic functions shut down, such as talking and chewing and swallowing the functions that require throat muscles. Because her chest muscles also lost their function, she lost the ability to cough. Then when a cold set in, the congestion in her lungs killed her. It s an ugly disease. It steadily robs the victim not only of normal activity, but also of all dignity. While I know that some ALS patients have continued enjoying life for many years, I was secretly glad that my mother did not have to suffer any more than she did. She didn t understand what was happening to her, and neither did I. Fortunately, after a while, I was able to remember her in healthier days when we shared so many good times. These memories are what led me to get doused with the coldest water I ve experienced since the Ice Storm of And I m proud of myself and all those others who have taken the challenge. Many may not understand the importance of the money they are donating or the incredible good that has come out of the publicity generated to support the ALS Association, but it s all good. This simple fundraiser has gone viral. As of this writing, more than $72 million has been pledged to ALS. I am blown away by the exponential growth of the initial effort that inspired national and international participation through social media. The monetary benefits of that one, cold moment repeated many times over will advance research of this disease, raise awareness of ALS, increase public education and advocacy, and also help those afflicted with the disease. The Bella Challenge Here s my challenge to you, Bella readers: If you accept the Ice Bucket Challenge, send me a picture of your dousing to aikenbellamagazine.com and I ll publish it and your name in Bella (limited to space; deadline: September 20). If your picture doesn t make it into Bella, your name will. If you make a donation to the ALS Association (Send to ALS Association, Gift Processing Center, PO Box 6051, Albert Lea, MN 56007), tell me how much and we will tally up the total and publish it. I am grateful to all of you who accept the challenge, but more importantly, if she were alive, Marian Urban would be the most grateful of all. Kathy Huff Cunningham REAL.Personal. HEALTHCARE. When you trust your hospital this much, there s just no reason to go anywhere else. Natalie Carlisle Two-and-a-half years ago, Natalie Carlisle and her husband Patrick chose Aiken Regional Medical Centers for the birth of their daughter Emma. When their second child was on the way, Natalie says, We knew we wanted to go back to the Women s LifeCare Center at Aiken Regional. This time was more complicated. At 25 weeks pregnant, Natalie had to have her gallbladder removed. She says, I would have been terrified, but Dr. Minto and her staff were so caring. Natalie and Patrick s son Brennan was born at the Women s LifeCare Center. Natalie says, When you trust your hospital this much, there s just no reason to go anywhere else. I should know I was born at Aiken Regional too! Real Personal Healthcare at Aiken Regional. To learn more, visit Physicians are on the medical staff of Aiken Regional Medical Centers, but, with limited exceptions, are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Aiken Regional Medical Centers. The hospital shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

4 bellabuzz Downtown Aiken September 5, 6 Aiken s Makin, Park Ave., 9 a.m. 6p.m. This two-day arts and crafts event features handmade crafts, exhibits, food and entertainment. Visit aikensmakin. net for directions. Sponsored by the Greater Aiken Chamber of Commerce. Aiken s Makin Sidewalk Sale, 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. Come downtown to find the best bargains on the highest quality goods. For more information, contact the Aiken Downtown Development Association at (803) September 6 Meet a Master Gardener, Aiken Farmers Market, Williamsburg Street between Park and Richland, 8 a.m. 12 noon. The first Saturday of each month from May to November, meet a master gardener who will answer questions and identify plants, weeds, and any other mystery items the public brings. September 6 Aiken Historic Tours, departing from the Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum, 10 a.m. Guided trolley tours featuring historic homes and churches, equestrian sites, the Civil War s Battle of Aiken, the live oak canopy on South Boundary, a guided walking tour of Hopelands Gardens, the Thoroughbred Hall of Fame and Racing Museum. Tickets are sold in advance. Call (803) for reservations. September 9 Snakes of the Southeast, Birds and Butterflies of Aiken, 117 Laurens St., 7 p.m. Dr. Whit Gibbons, Professor Emeritus at UGA s SREL will present a lecture using live snakes of the region, both venomous and harmless. Call (803) for more information. SEPTEMBER community calendar September 20 Southern Living Magazine: Test Kitchen, The Willcox, 100 Colleton Ave, Aiken, 12 noon 7 p.m. Test Kitchen on the road with Chef Robby Melvin, test kitchen director at Southern Living and The Willcox Executive Chef Regan Browell. Both demonstrate Sunday Supper and grilling recipes. Cost is $35 per person and includes light lunch and beverage. Great Grilling begins at 5 p.m. and includes Southern bites and a beverage. Call (803) for more information. September 20 Equine Flea Market, benefiting the Gaston Livery Stable, 10 a..m. to 4 p.m., 1315 Richland Avenue East. Rain or shine. Buy, sell, trade anything and everything equine. To reserve a space or for more information, contact Suzan Sallstrom at or call Space prices: private vendors, $25/space. Commercial vendors, $50/space. Reservation deadline: September 16. September 27 Book lecture by authors Charles and Caroline Todd on The Great War: Before and After, concerning World War I, time frame of many of the Todds Ian Rutledge novels set in England. 12 noon, First Presbyterian Church, 224 Barnwell Ave. NW. $25/ticket. Sponsored by the Aiken AAUW. Guests are encouraged to arrive at 11:30 in order to purchase books before the noon luncheon. There will also be an opportunity to purchase books and have them signed after the luncheon. Tickets are available at Booklovers Bookstore, Re-Fresh, Party Tyme, and Material Things. Proceeds will go to AAUW scholarships and educational programs. Contact Darlene Rittel, for more information. Aiken Center for the Arts 122 Laurens St. SW Hours: Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. September 1 27 Anne Rauton Smith Exhibit Judy Adamick Exhibit September 11 Artist Reception for the Artists of Cedar Creek, Anne Rauton Smith, and Judy Adamick, 6-8 p.m. Free admission. Aiken County Public Library 314 Chesterfield St. SW September 6 Storytime Saturday, 10:30 a.m. Stories, songs and fun activities designed for ages birth through five. September 11 LEGO Club, 4-5 p.m. Grades K-5 can show off their super building skills! No registration required. September 12 Team Advisory Group, 4 5 p.m. Help plan teen programs for the fall, choose new teen materials, and earn volunteer hours. Students aged can brainstorm ideas and munch on refreshments. Call Kimberly at (803) for more information. September 13 Movie, Captain America: Winter Soldier, rated PG p.m. the Candy Castle for a sweet surprise. Open to ages September 26 Teen Movie Night, 7 p.m. Eat pizza, watch a movie, and hang out with friends after the library closes. Open to grades 6 12 only. Movie choices include Amazing Spiderman 2, Frozen, The Hobbit, or Mirror Mirror. September 27 Susanna Ashton, co-editor of The South Carolina Roots of Africa- American Thought, 3 p.m. The importance of the writings of 19 African-American scholars, with supplementary essays, is recorded in this book, and will be further highlighted in a presentation by editor Susanna Ashton. All of these writers, from Francis Grimké to Jesse Jackson, have made far-ranging contributions to the history and culture of the United States. URS Center for the Performing Arts 126 Newberry St. SW Tickets and information: September 5, 6, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20 Aiken Community Playhouse presents The Music Man, all shows at 8 p.m. with the exception of the September 14 show at 3 p.m. September 25, 26 Annie Moses Band, 7:30 p.m. Unlike any ensemble in America today. Described as classical crossover, the band s innovative sound has delighted audiences around the world. September 14, 21, 28 Sunday Polo, Historic Whitney Field, 3 p.m. Aiken Polo Club will hold matches every Sunday at 3 p.m. for $5 per person at the gate or $25 for a ticket to the social tent. Call (803) for more information. September 18 Movie, Heaven is for Real, rated PG. 7 p.m. September 25 Live Action Candy Land, 4 p.m. Step into your favorite board game as the Gingerbread Man and try to make it to Shellhouse Funeral Home, Inc. Family Owned & Operated Shellhouse-Rivers Funeral Home, Inc. 924 Hayne Ave., Aiken, SC JASON B. HUCKS Funeral Director GRAHAM P. HALL Funeral Director ROBERT W. SHELLHOUSE, Jr Funeral Director JASON B. HUCKS Funeral Director CODY ANDERSON Funeral Director Aiken s Only On-site Crematory C. MITCHELL RIVERS Funeral Director 715 E. Pine Log Rd., Aiken, SC BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

5 Bella Magazine will run announcements for free for non-profit organizations, community events, and Bella advertisers. Space may be limited. Please event information to by the 15th of the month before the event. DuPont Planetarium Ruth Patrick Science Education Center 471 University Parkway pubshows.html Tickets and information: September 7, 21, 28 Solar System Adventure Tour, 7 p.m. Become a Planet Specialist, Math Expert or Flight Engineer while your planetarium spaceship takes you on an educational adventure past the sun, moon, and planets of our solar system. We need you to have a successful mission! Appropriate for all ages. Blown Away: Wild World of Weather, 8 p.m. Viewers will be blown away as they experience the fascinating world of weather in this planetarium show. Along with spectacular weather images, this program features a journey into space to explore the sun s effect on weather. You will also travel through the water cycle with Drippy, the water drop, and meet news meteorologists who explain what causes weather. You ll learn about storm prediction and safety as you are swept into a thunderstorm, immersed in a hurricane, and caught up in a tornado! Target audience: Ages 8 and up. September 14 Dark Shadows, 7 and 8 p.m. In this live program, you will learn how dark shadows are related to the phases of the Moon and to solar and lunar eclipses. The program includes handson activities, stunning images, and Digistar segments. It ends with an inspiring video of a total solar eclipse. Etherredge Center 471 University Parkway Tickets and information: September 1 30 Art Gallery: Mary Gilkerson & Matt Buck, Lobby. September 11 Faculty Art Recital, 7 p.m. Admission is free. September 21 Gospel Warriors, 2 p.m. September University Theatre presents Experimental Relief, 7:30 p.m. Aiken Regional Medical Centers 302 University Parkway Support Group Meetings: AA: Every Sunday and Wednesday evening, 7:15 p.m., Aurora Pavilion. Bariatric: 2 nd Wednesday, 6-7 p.m., ARMC, Bariatric Services, 2nd floor, room 209; register at The Lunch Bunch Bereavement- Grief Support for Adults: 1 st Wednesday, noon to 1 p.m., ARMC, Cafeteria Dining Room A. Cancer: 3 rd Wednesday, 3-4 p.m., First Baptist Church parlor. CSRA Dream Catchers -Traumatic Brain Injury and Disability: 1 st Monday every month, 6-7 p.m., Walton Options for Independent Living, 325 Georgia Ave., North Augusta; register at Diabetes: 2 nd Tuesday, 3-4 p.m., Odell Weeks Activity Center. Registration: Lupus: 3 rd Thursday of the month, 7 9 p.m., ARMC, Dining Room A Mended Hearts: 2 nd Friday, 10:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m., USCA Aiken Business Conference Center Pink Ribbonettes: 1st Tuesday, the American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Self-Help Group for people diagnosed with breast cancer; guest speakers; 10:30 a.m. to noon at Millbrook Baptist Church. To register, call Irene Howley at or Diane Hadley at Aiken Cares: 2 nd Tuesday, Alzheimer s Support Group, for family members and caregivers, 11 a.m. to noon, Cumberland Village Library, 2 nd floor. Look Good Feel Better: 3 rd Wednesday, free program for female cancer patients actively undergoing or about to start treatment, 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Cancer Care Institute of Carolina at ARMC. To register, call Teens Under Fire: 4 th Monday, ARMC Dining Room, 4-6 p.m. This prevention/intervention program looks at youth drug abuse, violence and crime by exposing teens ages to the harsh consequences of high-risk decisions. Odell Weeks Center 1700 Whiskey Road September 1 30 Toddler Time, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Use the gym to run, chase and release energy. Ages 5 and under. $3 per visit or $20 for a 10-visit pass. September 6 The Stephen James CSRA Coin Club 13 th Annual Coin Show, 9 a.m. 4 p.m. Coin dealers will be present to buy, sell, trade and appraise all types of coins, tokens, paper money and currency. Admission and parking is free. September 17 Senior Extravaganza, 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Will have financial, medical, insurance, assisted living, and home improvement vendors. Call (803) for more information. Prior registration encouraged. Miscellaneous Venues and Events September 1 30 Registration for Kid s Marathon, sponsored by City of Aiken Parks, Recreation, and Tourism. The Kid s Marathon is a two-month running program for elementary aged children. The 1.2 mile Fun Run will be Saturday, November 1 at 9 a.m. Call (803) for more information. September 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Storytime in the Gardens, Hopelands Gardens behind the Racing Hall of Fame, 4 4:30 p.m. Local senior adults read aloud stories from children s books. Each child is given a book to take home. Bring a blanket or chair, drinks, and snacks. September 4 Yappy Hour, SPCA, 5 8 p.m. Bring your well-behaved and leashed dog to enjoy fresh air and sounds of summer. Free to attend and will include live entertainment and access to the dog park. Well-behaved, vaccinated dogs only, please. September 6 Aiken Horsepower Car Show, Home Depot parking lot, 1785 Whiskey Rd., Aiken, 6 p.m. Come see some of Aiken s finest classic cars. Visit aikenhorsepower.com for more information. September 12 Make New Friends 5K, Citizens Park, 3 p.m. Support the Aiken Girl Scouts traveling the world. These girls have been selected to attend destinations in Chile, Peru, Minnesota, Hawaii, and England. Call (803) for more information. September 19 Aiken Home Show, Aiken Fairgrounds, 561 May Royal Dr., Aiken, 12 noon 4 p.m. Sponsored by the Aiken Standard and will feature products and services for home and garden. Prizes available. Free admission. Visit aikenhomeshow.com for more information. September 22 Playing Fore the Pets & Helicopter Ball Drop, Houndslake Country Club, 8 a.m. Four person captain s choice sponsored by Honda Cars of Aiken, featuring a par 3 hole-in-one change to win a new car. Breakfast provided by Chick-Fil-A, lunch catered by Fatz Café. Travinia Italian Kitchen will be hosting the Vegas hole with appetizers and drinks. $75 per person, limited to 27 teams. Call (803) for more information. September 26 Festival of the Woods, 444 South Boundary Ave., Aiken, 6:30 p.m. An annual event to celebrate the history of the Hitchcock Woods. This year will mark the 75 th anniversary of the Hitchcock Woods Foundation. Call (803) for more information. [Continued on next page] Tax Planning Medicaid Planning Elder Law Estate Planning Revocable Trust Probate Wm. Ray Massey Tax Attorney Smith, Massey, Brodie, Guynn & Mayes, P.A. Phone Facsimile BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

6 [Continued from previous page] Outside Aiken September 2 The Story of the Baynham Pottery will be presented by Craig and Mark Baynham at the North Augusta Community Center located at 495 Brookside Avenue, 7 p.m. Sponsored by the Heritage Council of North Augusta. A representative from Leadership North Augusta will also be there to give an update on the progress of historical recognition of the Pug Mill, currently located under the James U. Jackson Memorial Bridge (13th Street Bridge). This program is free and the public is encouraged to attend. Refreshments are served. For more information, call Milledge Murray at September 9 Savannah River Site Public Tour, departing from the Applied Research Center, 12:30 p.m. Must be 18 years of age or older and provide two forms of identification. Call (803) for more information about attending. Limited seating, and tours sell out consistently. September 27 Last Saturday in the Park, The Living History Park, 299 W. Spring Grove Ave, North Augusta, 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Last Saturday of every month. Visit Perry Hill and the Backwoods Cabin as it will be bustling with activities of the 18 th century. Coming in October October 9 A Taste of Wine and Art at Aiken Center for the Arts (ACA), 7 p.m. Advance tickets are $45 for ACA members, $50 for non-members, or $50 and $60, respectively, after September 30. VIP tickets are available for $100 and include early admission. This year s theme is the culinary arts. Features silent auction, tastes of signature dishes from 20 of Aiken s best restaurants and caterers, wine tasting, beer tasting. October 11 Octoberfest in The Alley, Aiken, 6 p.m. Sponsored by Aiken Downtown Development Association (ADDA). Food vendors and authentic German cuisine as well as German beer and wine offered for your enjoyment. Call (803) for more information. Celebrate Sound! Don t Walk in Silence, fundraising walk to benefit the hearing-impaired, sponsored by Palmetto Sertoma, 9 a.m., the Village at Woodside, 1419 Silver Bluff Road. Register to be a walker, superwalker or virtual walker online at www. mycelebratesound.org/aiken. Alzheimer s Walk 2014, H. Odell Weeks Activities Center. Join Cyndi s Sweet Shoppe and the Alzheimer s Association at the nation s premiere fundraiser to end Alzheimer s. October 14 The Art of Taste Cookbook Lecture with author Virginia Willis, Aiken Center for the Arts, 6 p.m., $10. Call for reservations. Chef Virginia Willis is the author of Bon Appetit, Y all; Basic to Brilliant, Y all; Okra: A Savor the South Cookbook, and Grits by Short Stack Editions. The Chicago Tribune praised her as one of the Seven Food Writers You Need to Know. October Western Carolina State Fair, Aiken County Fair Grounds, 561 May Royal Drive. October 17, 18 New Ellenton Atomic City Festival, 10 a.m. 6 p.m. Family movie night on the 17 th and all day festival on the 18 th with the Palmetto Groove band headlining that night. October 25 Fall Steeplechase at Ford Conger Field Downtown for 55 Years WTW5800BW $699 Each WDP310PAAB $299 KUDS301XBL $549 $ 75 OFF! COUPON $75.00 Off wall oven or dishwasher installation! Expires 9/30/14 6 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

7 The Filson Academy Invites Bourbon Lovers to Rose Hill for an Education in Whiskey For all Bourbon lovers, Rose Hill will host an educational event concerning the legendary liquor on Saturday, October 4. The Filson Bourbon Academy, an eighthour class in the history and art of drinking Bourbon, will be presented by officials of the 130-year-old Filson Historical Society at a cost of $125. The Filson Bourbon Academy is a brand-neutral program designed to educate attendees in the origins of the native American whiskey in Kentucky, the Ohio Valley and Upper South. The programs find their origin in the extensive significant stories collected by the Society since The Academy is unique to the Filson Historical Society and travels around the United States giving programs. Bourbon Historian to Lead Michael Veach, a member of the Bourbon Hall of Fame and the Bourbon Historian for the Filson Historical Society, will be the speaker at Rose Hill. Veach is the author of Kentucky Bourbon History: An American Heritage. Over the past 20 years he has dedicated his time to studying the distilling industry. Only 50 seats are available at the day-long event, which includes Bourbon tastings and lunch at the Winter Colony estate, located at 221 Greenville St. NW in Aiken. History and Tastings A typical Bourbon Academy schedule includes morning sessions on the origins of Bourbon Whiskey, Tasting Bourbon, 19 th Century Bourbon, and Tasting Tennessee Whiskey and Rye, followed by lunch. Afternoon sessions cover Early 20 th Century Bourbon and Prohibition, Tasting Single Barrel and Small Batch Bourbons, Post-Prohibition to the Present, and Blind Tasting and Graduation. Stephen Mueller, co-owner of Rose Hill, explained that participants who finish the one-day course will receive a certificate; with a STAR certification, they may become an Official Bartender of the Bourbon Trail. They also receive a Glencairn whiskey tasting glass and a booklet of sources for future study and reference. To Sign Up Registration for the Academy can be accomplished directly through Filson at this website: or by calling The Filson to make your reservation at (502) The deadline for one of the 50 seats is October 1. BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

8 The Flying Foodie by Chef Belinda Feta, Blue Cheese and Gorgonzola What s the Difference? Feta Blue Gorgonzola How many times have you been in a restaurant and been confused by the different cheeses offered on salads or entrees? The most commonly seen cheeses on menus nowadays are Feta, Blue Cheese and Gorgonzola. Each has a unique taste all its own, and all vary in degrees of sharpness. Here is a little info on each type, and how to use them. Feta Cheese Feta cheese is one of the world s oldest cheeses, and has been made in Greece, Turkey, and other Balkan countries for centuries. It is white-brined curd, commonly produced in blocks, and has a slightly grainy texture. Today, feta-style cheeses are made by numerous producers in many countries around the world, including Denmark, France, Germany, Israel, and the United States. In October 2005, the European Union granted Greece Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status for its Feta, which meant that other European countries (which produce tons of Feta cheese), had to rename their cheeses. PDOapproved Feta must be produced by traditional methods, only in designated areas in Greece, and primarily from sheep s milk, though up to 30 percent goat s milk may be added. Though traditionally made of sheep s or goat s milk, today large commercial producers often use cow s milk. Feta is used as a table cheese, as well as in salads and pastries. BlueCheese Blue Cheese is a category of cheese that has been treated with molds like Penicillium, the mold used to make Penicillin to form interior pockets and veins that range in color from dark blue to blue-green to blue-black and everything in between. Most cheese makers strive for consistency and add the blue-mold strain (either in powder or liquid) to the cow s or sheep s milk or curds, or in some instances by spraying or inoculating the formed cheese. Because the cultures won t create bluing without air to feed the bacteria, the cheeses are pierced with metal skewers so that oxygen can reach the interior. Some of the more popular of the blues include Gorgonzola, Roquefort, and Stilton. Blue cheeses tend to be strong in flavor and aroma, which increase with age. Blue cheese is best eaten on its own or melted or crumbled over food. Gorgonzola Gorgonzola, one of Italy s great cheeses, is a specific type of blue cheese. It has an ivory colored interior that can be lightly or thickly streaked with bluish-green veins. This cow s milk cheese is rich and creamy with a savory, slightly pungent flavor. Gorgonzola is aged for two to three months and sometimes up to six months. When aged more than six months, the flavor and aroma can be quite strong, sometimes even stinky. Younger cheeses are sold as Gorgonzola dolce, while longeraged cheeses are sold as Gorgonzola naturale or Gorgonzola picante. What to Choose? Gorgonzola is produced in Northern Italy, used extensively in cooking and with wine and food, and has a unique taste and appearance. So what does all this mean? Well, if you re looking for a mild cheese, Feta is probably the way to go. It works well in most dishes, and gives a great cream texture. For the more adventurous, try some of the Blue Cheeses, Gorgonzola being a favorite of mine. Be sure to pay a little more for it, since better ingredients are used, and the flavor is more wellrounded, and not too sharp. Most major food and specialty stores have a cheese counter where you can try a few samples before you buy. Also, the people who run these counters are usually knowledgeable and can provide some great ideas about how to use the different cheeses, so don t hesitate to ask for their opinion. All of these cheeses are great on salads with dried fruit and nuts and a light balsamic vinaigrette. Try them out for yourself and find your own favorite. Easy Balsamic Vinaigrette ¼ cup balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 garlic clove, minced 1/2 cup olive oil Salt and freshly ground black pepper In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, mustard and garlic. Add the oil in a slow, steady drizzle, whisking constantly. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Or you can put all ingredients in a small jar and shake until emulsified. Belinda Smith-Sullivan is a food writer, personal chef, and pilot who enjoys exploring the off the beaten path culinary world. Her love of cooking and entertaining motivated her to give up a corporate career to pursue a degree in Culinary Arts from Johnson & Wales University. Now living in Aiken, she currently markets her own spice line called Chef Belinda Spices. Recently she was named Artisan of the Month by Augusta Magazine. 8 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

9 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

10 u Exploring Aiken s Past u by Anna Dangerfield Downtown s Croft Block Photo courtesy of Chris Lydle The Croft Block is a two-story building fronting on Laurens Street and bordered by Hayne Avenue to the north. For more than a century, it has been the address of professionals and businesses, including current tenants M.B. Jewelry and Beads, 3 Monkeys Fine Gifts, and re fresh. The building is attributed to George William Croft who was prominent in the formation and early affairs of Aiken County, as noted in P.F. Henderson s A Short History of Aiken and Aiken County. George William Croft (Photo courtesy of the Aiken County Historical Museum) George William Croft was born in According to a 1985 Aiken Standard newspaper article by Donald M. Law, Croft entered the Confederate Army in 1864, and arrived in Aiken to practice law in After the war, Croft s law practice flourished as evidenced by the construction of the Croft Block a real showplace in its time, Law said. Croft served in both houses of the South Carolina General Assembly and later was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He died during his first term of office in Washington in 1904 and is buried in Aiken s Saint Thaddeus Cemetery. In a memorial tribute to George Croft, a fellow congressman, D. Wyatt Aiken, declared that one of Croft s crowning achievements was sponsorship of legislation in the General Assembly to prohibit child labor in South Carolina cotton mills, Law wrote. Croft Block Since 1884, architects, jewelers, barbers and beauticians, lawyers, pharmacists, photographers, artists, assorted merchants and myriad others have worked in these offices and stores. Perhaps this was due to a very affordable rent. Attorney G.L. Toole rented an office from Croft for six dollars a month in the late 1800s. Also in the late 1800s, Wessels Brothers advertised: Many pretty things may be found in our stock suitable for wedding presents and birthday gifts; Have your eyes examined and glasses fitted by the new method; Jewelry and silverware, golf clubs of all kinds, sterling silver, porcelain, Aiken souvenirs. West side of Laurens Street between Park Avenue and Curve Street (now Hayne Avenue). This extraordinary panorama, photo circa 1905, shows a string of Aiken s most significant early business buildings. From left, the Farmers and Merchants bank; the William Peronneau Finley law office, Aiken s first brick building downtown; an Italianate brick store; the Croft Building, and to the extreme right, the massive Bank of Western Carolina. (Photo and cutline courtesy of the Aiken County Historical Museum and A Splendid Time, The Historic Aiken Foundation) A Drugstore for Grownups Susan Forrest Grove remembers Hall s Pharmacy located in the Croft Block on the corner of Laurens Street and Hayne Avenue, formerly Curve Street. It always seemed like a drugstore for grownups, she said. It was very quiet, but there was a small table with ice cream chairs so children were expected to come as long as they behaved. My brother and I loved going there just for treats. I remember the chocolate milks, not sodas, which were piled high with real whipped cream. I also remember that their phone number was 74. The Quattlebaums Hall s Pharmacy was founded in the mid-1870s by H.H. Hall, and later owned and operated by the Quattlebaums. Dr. and Mrs. Micah Jenkins (M.J.) Quattlebaum moved from Norfolk to Aiken in He was a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. Their son Harold Hampton Quattlebaum, a graduate of the Atlanta College of Pharmacy, continued as owner and operator of Hall s Pharmacy after his father s death. He also operated a photography business in Aiken. A 1926 newspaper advertised Hall s Pharmacy as installing an up-to-date soda fountain which is sanitary in all respects and equipped with every device that modern science has found to make a perfect drink. Margaret Holley We called him Dr. Q., Margaret Cushman Holley said of Harold Quattlebaum. He had a photography studio behind the drug store where he did portraits. I worked for him in 1950 and 1951 when I was in high school. We were a pharmacy, and we also sold cosmetics. I made milk shakes, grilled cheese sandwiches and cherry cokes at the snack bar. We had bar stools, tables and chairs. Customers came in for a snack because there were not many places to eat in Aiken at that time, she said. Professional offices were upstairs. They included the architectural firm of Hallman and Weems, along with the law offices of John Stansfield, Ed Cushman and Julian Salley. I learned from Mr. Salley that hard work won t kill you. He worked seven days a week and I would often run a cherry coke and a pack of Nabs up to him. I filled prescriptions and counted pills, but I did not work with the liquids. Only registered pharmacists were allowed to handle those. I learned that doctors can t write, but I knew that Dr. Q. could read their writing. I enjoyed my work because of the nice people we served. Les Boutiques du Patio Interior view of Les Boutiques du Patio (Photo courtesy of Vic Johnson) Margaret Cushman Holley taken by Dr. Q. in (Photo courtesy of Margaret Holley) Suite of offices of the former architectural firm of Hallman and Weems. (Photo courtesy of Leslie Alexander) Vic Johnson, a graduate of Aiken High School, Class of 46, remembers that Hall s Pharmacy had the best shakes and ice cream for after-school hangouts. Vic and partner Dan Hamann, who owned and operated The Patio Florist 10 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

11 on Whiskey Road for many years, opened Les Boutiques du Patio in the early 60s in the corner shop of the Croft Block that is now occupied by re-fresh. Les Boutiques was The Village branch of our flower shop which got its start in Mattie Hall s The Barn - Tea Room and Antiques. It was located on Richland where Kalmia Plaza is now located, Johnson said. Harte Realty Company In the 60s and early 70s, Harte Realty Company operated on the corner. Cecil Harte s logo was a photo of a heart with Harte Realty Company and her address. She sold real estate for 30 years, part of that time working with fellow agent Deanna Platt at that location. When Harte s sons, John and then Bob, graduated from law school, they practiced from an office close by. A music store also worked from that area. On the Corner SOHO, a contemporary women s clothing store, opened on this corner in It was operated by Shawn Horseman and his wife Lynn. Women s Echoes took occupancy in the 2000s. It had four partners Vivienne Bunce, Tina McCarthy, Deborah Brooks, and Shelley Schmidt and offered items to sell for women, men and children. Many items are the products of projects designed to aid villages in other countries, a 2006 Aiken Standard newspaper article stated. re fresh At one time, Mike Jerome worked for Cecil Harte. He and his wife Toni were complimentary of her. She was a business woman who incorporated the characteristics of a true Southern lady, Toni Jerome said. The Jeromes own re fresh, which now occupies the corner. The store sells upper end, contemporary costume jewelry. We look for handmade in America and attend the American Craft Retailers Exhibition, and we also seek other sources for our lines, Toni said. We attended artist Julie Adams open house the floor to make it uniform. On the edge of the floor was herring bone brick, the length of the building. There was the same tile as in 3 Monkeys, so we think it was all one store at one time. There also seems to be an alley of some sort behind our store. Toni owned the Artist Parlor for 27 years, and is happy to be back downtown in a retail environment. Having this business keeps our brains fresh and alive, she said. The Artists of the Croft Block The top floor of the Croft Block above re fresh is home to the Artists of the Croft Block. This second floor area of about 4,000 square feet was developed as a colony for artists. It was because of the light, local artist Leslie Croft Block 1884 (Photo courtesy of Bella magazine) Alexander said. The late owner, Patrick Brooks, thought this area would work well for artists. There were numerous windows that would allow a lot of light, perfect for artists. I helped him recruit various artistic occupants. Those who have enjoyed this space through the years include Julie Adams, Siva Aiken, Barbara Morgan, Louise Mellon, Pam Verenes, Ginny Southworth, Barbara Strack, Betsy Wilson Mahoney and Shelly Schmidt, along with others. Betsy Wilson Mahoney now paints at The Studio Where Art Happens, adjacent to re fresh on Hayne Avenue. Beside her studio is that of Shelly Schmidt, also a former member of the artists group. Her photography business is Oh Schmidt! Productions. Alexander paints in the suite of offices of the former architectural firm of Hallman and Weems. Perhaps these numerous windows once provided an easy way to observe the activity in the area below. There were livery and boarding stables on Curve Street (now Hayne), opposite Pendleton Street; a 1901 business directory listed Walker and Company as a livery and transfer stable on Curve Street. Gerald s hobby became our business. He loved cameras and collected them since he was 12 years old. He owned a large collection. I would give him one for Christmas and birthdays, Copley said. Unfortunately, their house burned in 1983 and all of his cameras were destroyed. The Copleys son Dale received his degree in Photography and Design in Atlanta, and later returned to help with the family business. In addition to working with the day-to-day operations, he also helped with the framing and photographic development. He was a photographer who specialized in weddings and portraits. He and his work were well-known in the area. The technology began to change with at least one of the new photographic machines costing about $75,000, Copley said. We began to sell appliances, then pianos, organs, and music from Turners in Augusta. Eventually, we sold the business and retired. We loved being on Laurens Street because it was busy and everyone knew each other. M.B. Jewelry and Beads Mary O Hare has leased the current storefront at 145 Laurens St. S.W. for nine years. She owns M.B. Jewelry and Beads where she is also the designer, in the space previously occupied by Tammy s Interiors. I needed to move from my southside location, O Hare said. I needed to expand my business, and I wanted to quit attending out of town shows to promote my jewelry. I also wanted to be on Laurens Street. O Hare approached Len Yaun who managed the building for owner Deborah Brooks and told him that she would take the building as is and wanted occupancy that weekend. I was the only permanent retail store on this side of the street when I moved in, she said. O Hare lived in Arizona and attended about five yearly jewelry shows. My husband was with Kimberly Clark and we were eventually transferred here. But my jewelry was in Aiken long before we ever lived here. Toni Jerome and I connected a long time ago, and she sold my jewelry through the Artist Parlor, she said. Helping others create their artistic jewelry, or designing and making them herself provides much pleasure for O Hare. She also enjoys exploring the history of the block where she beads. I share a courtyard with 3 Monkeys, she said. And there s a basement underneath that runs the length of the backside of this building, too. She also enjoys learning the history of Laurens Street. West side of Laurens Street between Park Avenue and Hayne Avenue, (Photo courtesy of Bella magazine) in October 2009, upstairs on the second floor of the Croft Block. I knew and admired all of the artists and told Buzz Rich that I was jealous because everyone was enjoying their work so much, Toni said. Buzz owned the building and invited us to be a part of it. We went up the stairs retired and came back down the stairs in business. The Jeromes began renovations on their streetlevel store in January of They opened up the wall where a record store once stood. They also painted and restored the floors. There was Italian terrazzo ceramic tile, cinder block and dirt, Toni said. We poured a concrete and acrylic mix over Photocraft Camera Company Another husband-wife team who owned a business on Laurens Street were Patty Copley and her late husband Gerald. Our company was Photocraft Camera Company where 3 Monkeys is today, Patty Copley said. We bought it in the early 1960s, sold it in the 1980s and paid rent to Mrs. Croft. It was a wholesale company when we bought it, Copley continued. We employed a Mr. Watkins who drove a VW and sold film to other companies through Kodak. We sold films, slides, batteries, and all kinds of cameras including Polaroid and Kodak. Gerald fixed the cameras or sent them to Atlanta for repairs. We later became a retail store. The local newspaper advertised the store as a camera supply firm that sells photographic equipment, with personal instruction. The Copleys love of their business stemmed from Gerald s long association with cameras. 3 Monkeys 3 Monkeys Fine Gifts sits between M.B. Jewelry and Beads and re fresh at 141 Laurens Street S.W. It is owned by Sallye Rich and Kathy Reynolds. These business partners are no strangers to operating a retail store. Their first venture was with fellow business partner Bill Thomasson in their gift shop on Laurens Street close to What s Cooking. Thomasson later moved to Charleston, and Rich and Reynolds retained the name and moved to their current location. Their giftware includes Simon Pearce glassware, home accessories, cookbooks, linens, china, and jewelry. They also maintain an active bridal registry. They renovated this space in 2011 and believe their area must have been part of Hall s Pharmacy. We have the same floor as the Jeromes at re fresh, Rich said. We are standing on the original floor, enclosed by the original brick wall, and overhead is [Continued on page 20] BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

12 ? Marvelous Misconceptions Who Knew? by Phyllis Maclay The truth will set you free. Jesus When was the Declaration of Independence signed? Who was first to fly across the Atlantic? What s it like on the dark side of the moon? Who said, You can fool all of the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but you can t fool all of the people all of the time? It was not Abraham Lincoln. No fooling. No records anywhere show he was the author of those words or that he ever spoke them. What about the story that he wrote the famous Gettysburg Address on a napkin or envelope while traveling on the train the dedication ceremony? First of all, the ride was too bumpy for writing. And Abraham Lincoln was not the kind of man to leave something as important as a presidential speech honoring the dead at Gettysburg for the last minute. Lincoln agonized for days about what he would say, and finished it a full day before his delivery of it. The Evil Hand The Salem witch trials were a fascinating event in U.S. history; it s been said hundreds were burned at the stake for refusing to confess to being a witch. The truth is that in 1692, 20 people were killed as a result of religious law. New England was a Puritan church-state, so that meant church and government were intertwined, which resulted in fighting and discord among the inhabitants. A group of rural folks wanted to form their own church, so they broke away from the congregation in Salem in 1672 and formed Salem Village. There was more fighting over who would become minister, and finally Samuel Parris, whose credentials included Harvard dropout and merchant, got the job. Skipping the part about Christians being peacemakers, Parris allowed conflicts to broil in his parish. In less than two years, events got out of control. Parris daughter and niece (ages nine and eleven), along with 12-year-old Ann Putnam (whose father was a powerful man in that region), seemed to be stricken with something that made them choke, convulse, and pass out. The local doc s diagnosis was that the girls were bewitched and under the spell of an evil hand. The Parris slave from the West Indies, Tituba, had been teaching the girls games involving fortune telling and sorcery. The logic of the day was to blame the non-christian. Tituba and two other women accused of witchcraft were marched to prison; that should have been the end of the witch trials. But the young girls loved their new fame and continued to accuse others of witchery, which triggered more hysterical accusations. This new crime also became a way of putting an end to feuds in the village, and more than 150 people were charged. Even after the girls admitted to making the whole thing up, logic was tossed out of the court room as the accused were told to admit to being a witch or be fitted for a hangman s noose. Conviction fell upon 28: five were spared after their confessions, a pregnant woman was pardoned, and two escaped. Not burned at the stake but hanged, 19 women lost their lives to this religious hysteria, and one man was suffocated as he lay pressed under a pile of stones and rocks. Americana 101 The year was 1620 and the Pilgrims landed at Patuxet, later named Plimouth (Plymouth), Massachusetts, by Captain John Smith s map. The passengers of the Mayflower came ashore to make their new home, but no one ever recorded finding a rock and carving the date of their arrival on it. It was more than a century later that the historical date appeared on a large rock at the landing of the Pilgrims. July 4, 1776 was the date the Declaration of Independence was signed, correct? Not exactly. The document was drafted by Jefferson, Franklin, and John Adams months before and was formally adopted July 4, 1776, by the Second Continental Congress at the Pennsylvania State House (Independence Hall). Only Charles Thomson and John Hancock put their signatures on the draft. It was sent to the printer who published it and distributed the document throughout the colonies. Congress ordered it to be transferred to parchment on July 15. The copy was finished and signed by 50 delegates on August 2, Other delegates eventually rode in to add their signatures that autumn. The Mason-Dixon Line is often believed to originate as the division between the North and the South during the pre-civil War era. The reality is that the two English surveyors, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, were paid to draw the line between the Calvert land in Maryland and the Penn property of Pennsylvania. They had been fighting for 100 years over who should collect taxes in the disputed land. Although people credit Henry Ford as the inventor of the automobile and assembly line, he did neither. But he did perfect them both after he envisioned the auto as a cheep box on wheels with a simple engine. After designing the Model T, he sold 11,000 of them in But he wanted to be able to produce a car for the masses, and after reading a book about Fredrick Taylor s idea of mass production, he ordered his engineers to get going on mass production using an assembly line for his Model T. This revolutionized the auto industry. He cut the cost of a car from $950 to $300 and produced a car every 24 seconds. As they made 248,000 automobiles, Ford paid his assembly line workers $5 a day (double the normal wage rate) to keep them from leaving a monotonous job. Charles Lindbergh, another Industrial Age icon, was not the first to fly the Atlantic, but rather the first solo pilot to accomplish that feat. Two Englishmen had flown across the ocean from Newfoundland to Ireland in 1919, a much shorter route that Lindbergh s. But he earned the name Lucky Lindy after he flew a dangerous and daring solo flight that required tremendous skill. Lucky Lindy flew the 3,600 miles from Long Island to Paris and earned the adoration of America and Europe. Lindbergh and Ford shared not only their fame and fortune; they both held anti-semitic political views and received medals from the Nazis. Lindbergh actually flew to Germany to inspect the Luftwaffe (German Air Force). A story emerged after President John F. Kennedy gave a speech in Germany in He told them, Ich bin ein Berliner, which means I am a Berliner. A Berliner was also a pastry served in Germany, so a myth evolved that Kennedy actually said, I am a jelly doughnut, and that the President was laughed off stage. The truth is that Kennedy hired a professional to translate his speech, and the German crowd understood him. 12 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

13 Urban legend spread the story that Fred Rogers (Mister Rogers Neighborhood show for kids) was a sniper and Navy Seal during the Viet Nam War. His sweaters were said to cover his tattoos. Both are bunk. Five Facts and Falsehoods About Humans 1. People only use about ten percent of their brains is a false statement. (Well, maybe except for some.) While only certain neurons are active at a certain time, the inactive ones are very important in brain function. 2. People cannot get warts from toads. Warts are caused by a virus that is found only in humans. 3. Fingernails and hair do not grow after a person dies. They appear to be longer because after death the human skin shrivels and shrinks from the base of hair and nails. 4. Booze does not warm up a body. It does cause blood vessels near the surface of the body to dilate which can actually lower the core body temperature. 5. Forget what you ve been advised and wake up that sleepwalker. It might confuse the drifter, but you will save the person from stumbling or losing balance. Nature Nuggets Poinsettias are not fatal if ingested by people or felines. The flower can irritate the stomach or skin, and eating them may result in vomiting or diarrhea, but the American Association of Poison Control has never reported any fatal cases, and only a few cases required medical treatment. The ASPCA reports that eating the bitter plant may cause the same symptoms for cats as in human beings. The bumblebee should not be able to fly, so the saying goes. This was based on the hypothesis of a French entomologist in the 1930s. Even after he discovered he was wrong, the false premise that scientists calculate bumblebees should not be able to get off the ground still lives. Bamboo is neither a tree nor bush, but a grass with stems as strong as wood. From the Bambuseae group, this grass is unique because of its structural material (the cane). Urban legend circulates the story that the daddy longlegs spider possesses toxic venom but because of the shape of its jaws cannot bite and penetrate human skin. Actually, the spider s bite can puncture skin and releases a small amount of venom that may result in a very mild burning sensation lasting a few seconds. Silly Science Myth: There is no gravity in space. Fact: There s lots of it out there. Astronauts seem to be weightless because they are actually in orbit around the earth; they are falling towards Earth but never landing. Myth: Meteors are hot when they land on the earth. Fact: meteors are almost always cold, covered with thin ice or frost. They are so cold from their journey in space that not even heat from entry warms them up; it only burns off an outer layer or two. Myth: There is a dark side of the moon. Fact: All areas of the moon receive the sun s light at some time. People believe there is a dark side of the moon because we can only see one one side of it as it revolves around our planet. Myth: The Coriolis Effect is induced by the Earth s rotation and is affected by the location (Northern or Southern hemisphere). This determines the clockwise or counter clockwise spinning of water going down a drain. Fact: The Coriolis Effect is too weak to control the direction of draining water. It does affect things on a larger scale like ocean currents and weather systems. Myth: Lightning never strikes twice in the same spot. Fact: It does. It favors high trees or buildings and they can be zapped many times during storms. The Empire State Building gets hit an average of 25 times a year. Myth: Speaking of the Empire State Building, a penny dropped from it will kill a person or crack the sidewalk below. Fact: A penny would not fall faster than miles per hour, which is not fast enough to crack concrete or a human skull. Besides, the tapered shape of the building would prevent anything dropped from the observation deck to fall directly below. Final Facts Nero was 35 miles from Rome when it burned so he did not play the fiddle during its destruction. Another Roman myth is that the vomitorium was the room where party guests went to induce vomiting so they could return to their feasts to eat more. While the Romans were know to eat and drink in excess to the point of getting sick, the vomitorium was not the place to do it. This was a passageway designed to get people in and out of a theater or amphitheater. The Coliseum was so well designed with many of these passages that it would seat 50,000 people in 15 minutes. Big Ben is not the huge clock over the House of Parliament in London, but it is the largest bell of the clock. It weighs 13 tons. Albert Einstein never failed math in school, but he did fail the entrance test to the Swiss Federal Polytechnic School. He was two years younger than his fellow classmates who took the test. Xmas is not an attempt to take Christ out of Christmas. Monks in Old England (1551) used X instead of writing out Christmas, because it stands for the Greek letter Chi, the first letter of Christ in Greek. Phyllis MacLay is a published writer of articles in Country Woman Magazine, Parent Magazine, Easy Street Magazine, and Lancaster, Pennsylvania, newspapers. Originally from Pennsylvania, Phyllis moved to Aiken from Texas. She has published children s plays and is now selling online and at Booklovers Store in Aiken her latest novel, A Bone for the Dog, the chilling story of a father trying to rescue his little girl. (Visit Her latest published work Sweet Brew and a Cherry Cane appears in the anthology Nights of Horseplay by the Aiken Scribblers. BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

14 Arts Center Thrives over 40+ Years by Stephen Delaney Hale Remembered in different ways by those who came into its orbit at different times over its 42 years, The Aiken Center for the Arts is not only the heartbeat of the arts in downtown Aiken, it is also the unifying rhythm of the very downtown itself. The Aiken Center for the Arts (ACA) is daily at work with its mission to support the arts and artists in whatever form their work takes. Elizabeth Williamson, the Center s new executive director since July of last year, is working with the board, the staff and the area s many artists and arts groups to reform a mission that will embrace and support all the arts and many partnerships in Aiken s arts community, with a new emphasis on performance arts, she said not long after her installation last year. Happily for most who have lived with the Aiken Center for the Arts (ACA) for four decades, one thing has remained the same, people coming together, doing what they love to do, surrounded by other artists, doing whatever it is they do. That fellowship of artists creates a synergy that supports and inspires. Lonesome artists have accomplished great Elizabeth Williamson, ACA Executive Director things in the past, but fulfilled and supported artists enjoy their work so much more, and they don t cut their ears off. More than a Great Gift Store Many people in the Aiken area think of the Aiken Center for the Arts as a great gift store and it is. Anyone in need of a special and different gift for whatever purpose and for whatever kind of character, will find it at ACA. Many of them are unique to the shop and many are even made by ACA members. Do you need gifts for people who surround themselves with color and excitement? You ll see something that fits them within a few minutes. Does a friend enjoy peaceful painted landscapes? ACA has lots of them. Do you need to fill a large space in a room? No problem. A small space to balance an end table? There are about 20 to choose from. Perhaps best of all, besides how beautiful each treasure is on its own, you are supporting the vision, skill and inspiration of an independent artist and usually one who lives here or not too far away. Keep Walking The gift shop, just inside the front door, is as far as some people get, which is fine. But one day, keep walking toward the back of the twostory, 22,000-square foot space that is constantly changing, thanks to a gathering of dreamers, craftsmen and a catchall category called artists, who are forever creating what inspires them. Take your own magical mystery tour through this sometimes organized, sometimes not, menagerie of fine art paintings in oils, watercolors and other media, statuary, pottery, dance, acting, music and signing, film, instructional classes some of them in hands-on art experiments and some in theory whatever you might expect to find, and most likely on a good day, some things you ve never seen or even thought of before. It is like a 22,000-square foot brain thinking different things in different parts and it never stops. In the Beginning In the beginning, there were Nancy Wilds and Pat Koelker, kindred artistic souls who had been given use of an eclectic studio building on the block-square Rose Hill estate on Barnwell Avenue across the street from Aiken Prep School. Rose Hill continues today as a beautiful and highly successful bed and breakfast, restaurant and entertainment venue. The Shops on Hayne at Pendleton 345 Hayne Avenue SW Guest Cottage Linens & Gifts 405 Hayne Avenue SW Antiques & Accessories Sterling Silver & Old Plate 409 Hayne Avenue SW BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

15 In 1972 when Pat and Nancy began, it was still the Winter Colony estate of Aunt Claudia Phelps, and the site of the founding of the Garden Club of South Carolina in 1930 by her mother, Mrs. Sheffield Phelps. Claudia Phelps served as the state club s president between 1936 and 1938, and the gardens of Rose Hill became renowned among horiculturists and garden enthusiasts for the mother and daughter s stunning collection of camellias, azaleas, hollies and English boxwoods that they collected during their many travels around the world, and cultivated in the three greenhouses they maintained at their estate, thus proving that art knows no boundaries and is not confined to canvas. Rose Hill was built at the turn of the last century in the shingle style, common in New England, but rare in the South. Rose Hill was put on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and soon afterward, the stables and outbuilding were made available for Rose Hill Art Center. It soon provided a much-needed studio facility for the brand new University of South Carolina Aiken. At her death in 1984, Miss Claudia stated in her will that the art center could remain at her home for five years without rent. Nancy Wilds A renowned artist, best known for her illuminated manuscripts and stained glass creations, Nancy Wilds, a member of the Phelps family, explained, It was my children the reason we started doing art at Rose Hill, remembered the still tiny and still very active woman. My son Alex said the rec room would make a wonderful art center. It later turned out to be a wonderful place for Alex s guitar playing friends, about 20 of them that nobody knew, Nancy said with her characteristic wit. Aunt Claudia let us have the stables and the studio in the early 70s. We started it Pat and I together started the school together. Within a short time it was associated with USC Aiken when the school was in Banksia, now the County Museum. They didn t have an art department so we gave them some space for their teachers. That was the beginning of their program. There was art all over the place; we built kilns and all that and it lasted until Aunt Claudia died. She left in her will that we could stay there as an art center for five more years. Nancy mentioned many artists and volunteers who were very important to the early days of the center, including potter David Stewart, Becky Robbins, and members of the Artist Guild. David and Becky were enormously helpful. They did everything and they helped us hold regular events in the rose garden that we called An Evening of Wine and Roses to help raise the little money we ever had to do projects. Nancy said things operated on a basic level in the beginning, a little art and design and drawing. David Stewart had a very lively pottery studio and members of the Artist Guild did things they wanted to do. We offered children s classes on Saturday and during summer, all kinds of drawing and macramé and pottery, so it was a fulltime busy art school for a few years. One of the professors from Augusta came over and did life drawings with adult models in the evenings. Horseplay Isn t Just for Kids The most enduring and visible fundraiser for the Aiken Center for the Arts was Horseplay, patterned after the wildly successful art cows in Chicago and Houston. However, Aiken opted for its favorite fourlegged creature, the horse, instead. From October 2003 to mid-march 2004, there were 31 art horses on display throughout Aiken. Made of fiberglass by the Prewitt Fiberglass Company of Gibbon, Nebraska, at a cost of approximately $2,000 per horse, they were decorated by designated artists with different themes. Weighing about 150 pounds each, eventually the horses were herded into an auction site where eager bidders purchased them. The nearly $250,000 raised through the Horseplay project has been dedicated to scholarships and special programs for youth and senior citizens for the past 10 years. Seventeen of the art horse entries stayed in Aiken, and many can be seen at the locations below. (The list is also available at the ACA desk upon request.) Some of the art horses have been damaged irrevocably and will not be seen again. Also, from time to time, the horses are withdrawn from public view in order to be repainted. Horseplay Art Horses and Their Stomping Grounds Hopelands Gardens: Magnolia Mare, Hav Sum Fun, and Stonerside Green Boundary Club: History Maker The Aiken Center for the Arts: Splendor in Glass Aiken Community Playhouse: Dustin Hoofman Sotheby s (Laurens Street): His Spirit is the Wind in Aiken USCA-Etherredge Center: Down by the Water The Aiken Municipal Building on Laurens Street: Palmetto/American Equine Laurens Street at Park Avenue (Morgan Fountain Circle): The Patriot Newberry Street Festival Site: Horse of a Different Color Bank of America at Park Avenue: Steed Freedom USCA entrance: Regions Spirit of America Mead Hall at Aiken Prep campus: Semper Virdis Woodside Plantation entrance: Horsin Around The Patriot But once Aunt Claudia died, Nancy moved out into the country and the center at Rose Hill began to fade away. Pat Koelker Nancy s partner at Rose Hill was the multifaceted artist Pat Koelker. Her daughter Malia, of Malia s Restaurant, next door to the current ACA, remembered her early years making a mess, with Nancy and her mother. She loved to make stuff and this was a great place, remembered Malia. It was just cool print making, a potting studio, a gallery, a painting gallery in the carriage house. Mom did everything pottery, batik, painting, pastels, stained glass, and macramé always just making some sort of a mess. And artists would come over and make their own mess. Pat studied at Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha and the family moved to Aiken in 1965 when her husband went to work at the Savannah River Plant. His early death in 1968 left Pat to take care of Malia and her older brother Jamie. Pat opened an art studio on York Street across from St. Mary s School before joining forces with Nancy Wilds at Rose Hill. I remember always having plaster and beads and we just made things all the time, Malia said recently. Mom taught me to love art and I do, but I don t do it. I have a degree in art history and sculpture from the University of Georgia, but I m kind of busy now, [with the restaurant]. I always promise myself I ll do it when I retire. Jamie, who no doubt also came by a strong measure of his remarkable creativity from his mother, is a renowned filmmaker and co-owner of Aiken-based Storyline Media with his wife, director and story architect Chris Saxon Koelker. The First President Was Almost the Last John Heaton, owner of The Curiosity Shop with his wife Amy Neely, was the first president of the center once it created a formal governing body. He remembered, About 1988 I was asked to be the treasurer of the board and came up with the bright idea that, to become solvent, board members should pay dues. They resigned en masse, after which I was left as president. Among my first acts as president was to preside over its demise because as of December 31, 1988, Aunt Claudia s stipulation ran out, and Rose Hill Art Center no longer had an option to purchase that property for what was a minuscule amount of money, said Heaton. Nancy and Pat had moved on, and activity stopped at Rose Hill. Then it became a seminary and the monks gave us three years to stay there, Heaton recalled. As president, Heaton handpicked a board of directors who, while familiar with the arts, were not artists themselves, with the exception of one poet. We had to start looking for a place to go, rather quickly, said Heaton. He noted that the addition of banker John Cunningham to the group gave them a fighting chance of survival. We needed a focal point downtown. Since [Continued on next page] BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

16 [Continued from previous page] there was almost nothing going on in Beautiful Downtown Aiken (an inside joke with John), we nearly had our pick of just about any property. There was Julia s, Smitty s [Lionel Smith, Ltd.], Aiken Drug, Plum Pudding, Elliott Office Supply, a hardware store, the Farmers and Merchants Bank and Security Federal and a few another banks and that was just about it, as far as economic activity downtown, he commented. Cunningham, Heaton and a few others set their sights on an abandoned hardware store that had been given to Augusta newspaper mogul Billy Morris by his aunt when he was in his teens. After months of discussions, it was agreed that the arts center would pay $400,000 for the $1,000,000 building and Mr. Morris would get a $600,000 tax write-off, or so Heaton remembers, in broad terms. It was at this time that the now-named Aiken Downtown Development Association (ADDA) was forming under the leadership of Aiken native Bill Cullum and citizens from Woodside to the north side came together in a bootstraps organization called Aiken 20/20 to fight away the fear of the then-new Aiken Mall and the vision of the downtowns that were disappearing all over America. With a goal of raising $3.5 million, Aiken 20/20 actually brought in more than that and donated $600,000 to the arts. Other chunks of money went to form Public Education Partners (PEP), the Aiken/Edgefield Economic Development Partnership, further downtown beautification, and some other major projects that all survived and have blossomed today. The movement had City backing, but it was done with all locally donated private funds. Owning that building meant everything in the world to the Aiken Center for the Arts, said Heaton. People are not going to give you money for rent and they are not going to give you money for bricks and mortar, but if you already own the building, they will give you money to keep it fixed up and to support the good work going on inside. Once open, we did everything we could to reach out, said Heaton. The whole idea is that the Arts Center is for everybody, not just one segment of the community. A lot of people then came together with a common interest in promoting arts in Aiken and to have a place to enjoy all kinds of arts functions, said Heaton. From that moment on, The Aiken Center for the Arts became the anchor for the redevelopment of downtown Aiken. President Skipper Current ACA President, Skipper Perry, who is also a former state representative and City Council member, said he completely agrees with Heaton. Involved with the ACA for years, Perry explained, It really did a great deal for art in Aiken and for Aiken as a community. It helped focus the revitalization of downtown. It gave the Artist Guild a place to have their functions, a place for children s classes and also the art department at USC Aiken. And now it has grown into a full-fledged arts showpiece in every sense, showing the work of both local and established artists, teaching classes, introducing the public to art and providing great spaces for business meetings and non-profit fundraising events, continued Perry. Organizations rent event space from us, said Perry, and it is the perfect place to showcase ourselves, citing Antiques in the Heart of Aiken and a new tradition, an Oscar Night Party to watch the Oscars on the center s movie screen and vote for Aiken s own local leading men and ladies. The Antiques in the Heart of Aiken is a three-day show organized by Lisa Castles of York Cottage Antiques, showcasing furniture, art, silver, jewelry and more during a winter weekend. (The 2015 dates are February 5-8.) Tickets for the preview party are $60 for non-members and include cocktails and hors d oeuvres and admission over the next three days. The daily tickets are $10 per day. It is here that serious collectors and dealers from around the Southeast and even farther afield, come to get first dibs on the real treasures, so everyone should consider that, said Perry. This is a great opportunity for interior designers to bring clients and talk about pieces and concepts without a lot of other people around, hinted Perry. The food is great too, prepared by volunteers in the Center s own Sweetheart Café. There is also lunch served for a fee during the rest of the show. Celebrate Aiken s Culinary Arts in October October 2014 at the Aiken Center for the Arts For tickets call or visit the Arts Center BUY YOUR TICKETS A Taste of Wine & Art THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9 7:00 9:30 PM Taste More Than 50 Wines Sample Signature Dishes from more than 20 local restaurants Select Beer Samples, non-alcoholic beverages and cash spirits bar Spectacular Silent Auction *VIP Tickets include early entry at 6:15 PM, one FREE cash bar drink ticket, and a commemorative bottle of wine. More Culinary Arts Events in October Exhibit Opening & Artist Reception Wine 101 Custom Painting Wine Glasses Class The Art of Taste Cookbook Lecture with Virginia Willis Bottles & Brushes Classes NEW THIS YEAR! VIP * TICKETS Members: $45 by Sept. 30 $50 after Sept. 30 Non-Members: $55 by Sept. 30 $60 after Sept. 30 VIP Tickets: $ Laurens Street SW, Aiken, SC Event Sponsors: All proceeds support the AIken Center for the Arts, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Visit for event details. 16 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

17 Like Us! Ms. Williamson is hard at work at both the art part and the sustainability part of any growing organization. She said one easy thing people can do to help is to Like the Aiken Center for the Arts on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram. You can go on several of those and learn what is happening, buy tickets and show your support in many ways, said the new executive director, eager to build a data base of supporters. We will post events and sell tickets in advance on these social networking platforms but there are a lot of ways you can share information now that can be done much more efficiently through social media, which is very advantageous to artists and to arts groups. If you buy a ticket to a dance recital and we get you logged in through one of these portholes, you will get an invitation to our next dance function, she said with a happy smile, almost as if she is seeing the audience grow. We are working with the playhouse and are going to institute activity classes for young people, she explained. The board is in the process of writing a new protocol for artist submission and we expect to have a growing list. Our gallery is now scheduled through 2016 and all of the galleries need to be scheduled at least a year in advance. It is all very exciting, said the new Southerner. She promised much more to come for Aiken artists and arts aficionados in the future. Ms. Williamson is hard at work at both the art part and the sustainability part of a growing organization. She says one easy thing people can do to help is to Like the Aiken Center for the Arts on Facebook and Twitter. Social media is an easy way to connect with our audience and give and receive immediate feedback. Through our Facebook page we promote our upcoming events and connect it to our website where patrons can purchase tickets. It s also a great way to share pictures of recent activities at the arts center, said the new executive director. In the past year we have quadrupled our social media following from 300 to more than 1,200. The public has responded very well, she said with a happy smile, almost as if she is seeing the audience grow. There are many great things taking place at the Arts Center. We re strengthening our foundation to support future growth, she explained. Collaboration and partnership is very important to us. We are always looking for ways we can work with other arts organizations, whether it be events or classes. The exhibition committee has established submission guidelines for the gallery and we are in the process of scheduling exhibits through It is all very exciting, said the new Southerner. She promised much more to come for Aiken artists and arts aficionados in the future. Stephen Delaney Hale is a freelance writer in Aiken and a regular contributor to Bella Magazine. Celebrate the Culinary Arts at the Aiken Center for the Arts The culinary arts will be celebrated at the Aiken Center for the Arts during the entire month of October in various events, programs and classes. The many options include an art exhibit dedicated to food and wine; painting classes, a wine tasting class; The Art of Taste Cookbook Lecture; and the main event, A Taste of Wine and Art, featuring a tasting of more than 50 wines from around the world and sample size portions of Aiken s finest restaurants signature dishes. All proceeds support the Aiken Center for the Arts, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Artist Reception Celebrating A Taste of Wine & Art Exhibit Opening Thursday, October p.m. Free admission Celebrate the opening of the A Taste of Wine & Art exhibition featuring Sharon Taylor Padgett, D.S. Owens, and Linda Hardy, Abstract Alexandra, and the Gail Ebner exhibitions. Complimentary wine will be provided. Wine 101, Learn to Taste Like A Pro Friday, October 3 7 p.m. $30, advance registration required (closes September 26) Learn the basics and discover what you like in a wine so you can choose bottles in a restaurant or wine shop with confidence. We ll cover how wine is made, the difference between Old World and New World styles of wine, how climate affects the body, alcohol and acidity of wine, how to determine what you like and describe what you like. A Taste of Wine & Art Thursday, October p.m. (6:15 p.m. for VIP) Advance tickets are $45 for ACA Members and $50 for non-members through September 30. Tickets purchased between October 1-9 will cost $55 for ACA members and $60 for nonmembers. A limited number of VIP tickets are available for $100. Be the first to sample the food and wine and to bid on the silent auction! VIP tickets include early admission (6:15 p.m., 45 minutes before other guests), a complimentary bottle of wine, and a complimentary glass of wine from the cash bar. A Taste of Wine and Art features a tasting of more than 50 wines from around the world and sample size portions of signature dishes from more than 20 of Aiken s finest restaurants and caterers. Additional beverage choices include beer samples, non-alcoholic beverages, and a cash bar featuring spirits. The silent auction is dedicated to Happenings dinner gatherings, event packages, destination getaways, sports opportunities, etc. all created especially for this event. New this year, VIP ticket holders will receive early admission, a drink ticket for a full glass of wine at the cash bar, and a commemorative bottle of wine to remember the evening. Custom Painted Wine Glasses Class Saturday, October p.m. $45 A Taste of Wine and Art Specialty Class! Make a custom work of functional art. Everything is provided including the glasses. At the end of the class ACA Teaching Artist Tamara Smith will give you instructions to make your glasses hand-wash safe. The Art of Taste Cookbook Lecture with author Virginia Willis Tuesday, October 14 6 p.m. $10 Chef Virginia Willis is the author of Bon Appetit, Y all and Basic to Brilliant, Y all; Okra: A Savor the South Cookbook, and Grits by Short Stack Editions. The Chicago Tribune praised her as one of the Seven Food Writers You Need to Know. Her legion of fans love her knack for giving classic French cooking a down-home feel and reimagining Southern recipes en Francais. Willis writes the popular comfort food blog called Down-Home Comfort that celebrates food cooking for the Food Network and the Cooking Channel. She is a contributing editor for Southern Living and her articles have appeared nationally including Food52 and CNN as well as All Recipes, Country Living, Eating Well, Family Fun and Fine Cooking. As a nationally recognized Southern food and beverage authority, she has been featured in the Washington Post and USA Today and quoted in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. She is the former TV kitchen director for Martha Stewart Living, Bobby Flay and Nathalie Dupree. She was the producer of Epicurious on the Discover Channel and Home Plate for Turner Studios. In front of the camera, Virginia has appeared on Food Network s Chopped, Fox Family and Friends, Martha Stewart Living, Paula Deen s Best Dishes and as a judge on Throwdown with Bobby Flay. Bottles & Brushes Art Parties Every Monday & Wednesday 6 9 p.m. $30 In this 3-hour class students will be led through the painting process one step at a time. You are invited to bring your own snacks, glasses and bottle of wine. All paint supplies included. No experience necessary. Just come and have fun! All of the listed programs and events will take place at the Aiken Center for the Arts, 122 Laurens St. SW. Call (803) for tickets, reservations, or more information. Also visit www. AikenCenterfortheArts.org BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

18 The Early Years Aiken has always been blessed with its population, and acting in Aiken has always been good, said Thurmond Whatley, who has been involved with Aiken Community Playhouse (ACP) for 36 years. As early as 1940, Thurmond says, Aiken had a dedicated group of theater devotees who called themselves Aiken Little Theater. Few Aikenites today remember this troupe, whose goals included developing amateur directors and actors. Their first play was You Can t Take It with You, a production Cast of Fences (1995). strongly supported by the community. With no theater building, they rehearsed and performed in homes, high school gyms, and municipal buildings until World War II intervened. A permanent home for theater had to wait a few years until another group of theater enthusiasts arrived in Aiken. In 1952, with the advent of the Cold War and the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, with an approximate population of 5,000, was flooded with thousands of new residents. According to Thurmond, the newcomers brought with them an expectation of more arts involvement in Aiken. Many of them had participated in amateur theater in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and it didn t take them long to continue the tradition in their new home. The first production of this ambitious group was George Washington Slept Here, directed by Will Cole and starring Lecil Cushman and Garth Edwards. The production was well received by the community, and the amateur thespians were off! For the next 33 years they presented fulllength plays to the community, first using Aiken Municipal Auditorium and then Aiken Junior High School Auditorium for their performances. Season memberships grew and more performances were offered each year, including musicals. Soon Aiken was recognized statewide as having an unusually fine theater company for a city of its size. Aiken s First Permanent Theater After 20 years of performances many of which were rehearsed in homes, stables, or sheds it was clear that ACP needed a permanent facility to house accumulated sets, costumes, and equipment. All the World s a Stage A committee formed in 1968 got to work, and in 1971 ground was broken for a new theater building in Virginia Acres, which was up and running by Longtime Aiken residents remember that this original Aiken Community Playhouse Building is now the Ceramics Building on Two Notch Road behind Odell Weeks Center. The financial and hands-on support of members of the community, as well as the City of Aiken, played a significant role in the realization of the first permanent structure for theater in Aiken. The City of Aiken let the group use the land for free, community members contributed furnishings, garden clubs contributed shrubbery, and textile companies donated material for the curtains. Playhouse members helped with lighting, plumbing, heating, curtains whatever was needed. Marcia Harris, a mainstay at ACP since 1978, related some of the early adventures the actors and crew had in the old theater: #12 cans with floodlights hanging from the ceiling; old resistance dimmers and rheostats which required the use of hands and feet simultaneously from the lighting crew; music provided by tape recorders; and no wings or backstage! Despite the primitive conditions, with a permanent home, ACP prospered and soon was able to provide a year-round season and foster a Youth Wing and Garden Festival Theater. The Move Downtown And then, once again, external events changed the face of amateur theater in Aiken in a big way! Just as the beginning of the Cold War re-vitalized community theater in Aiken in the 50s, Opening Night at the new playhouse. the end of the Cold War and the downsizing of the Savannah River Plant brought about another big move for the Aiken Community Playhouse. The downsizing of the nuclear facility prompted business and political leaders in Aiken to focus on the revitalization of Downtown Aiken. Bringing the Playhouse as well as the Aiken Center for the Arts to the downtown area was part of the by Sally Bradley plan. According to Thurmond Whatley, ACP was a beneficiary of the forward thinking of city leaders. This was the right time; there was a lot of energy to revitalize, and the playhouse was considered an important part of coming downtown to try to revive night life. When the Washington Group expressed a desire for a downtown presence, Aiken Community Playhouse was offered an opportunity to share the building. Playhouse members and supporters came on board and began a campaign to raise $1.6 million. The pattern of abundant support from city government and the community which had been established in the old facility would continue to assure the success of live theater in Aiken. Wade Brodie and the Aiken Corporation were key players active in realizing the vision of the Downtown Development Association and encouraging ACP s move downtown. Angie Fitzgerald French, Director of the ACP board at the time, remembers it as an exciting period. John Oakland chaired the fundraising effort, including Vince Cloud, Dave Howard, Erwin Whittaker, and Thurmond Whatley in Ten Nights in a Barroom (1986). sponsorships of seats and various areas of the theater, as well as a variety of events: brunch at a horse show, performances of Cabaret, a formal dance in the theater before the seating was installed, Joye Cottage tours, a Middle Eastern dinner, and perhaps her favorite a character dinner sponsored by Malia s where everyone wore costumes from previous Playhouse productions. The result of the successful campaign is a facility which makes Aiken the kind of place people want to live, said Angie. The theater itself is the envy of many South Carolina towns: it houses seating for 300 people, has storage space for costumes and props, a shop for building and storing sets, state-of-the art sound and lighting, a fly system (with hoisting equipment), a stage suitable for dancing and gymnastics, a black box theater, and an orchestra pit. The first performance in the new theater Footloose, directed by Bradley Watts opened in October 2002, 50 years after the first performance by ACP in the Virginia Acres theater. Something for Everyone Every season at the new facility has a well-rounded variety of musicals, dramas, and Youth Wing performances. We work hard at maintaining the quality of the productions, says Marcia Harris. The facility has enabled a greater 18 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

19 The cast of Smokey Joe s Café. focus on teaching not only stagecraft, but lighting, sound, make-up, and costume design. The Youth Wing, under the leadership of Nancy Hansen, trains young people in theater, giving them skills which could lead to a career or a lifetime hobby, as well as confidence and self-esteem. According to Michael Gibbons, who served on the board and acted with and directed his own children at ACP, the Playhouse has been a welcoming environment and second home for him and his family. With a state-of-the-art facility a reality in the heart of Aiken, what more is there to wish for? Marcia Harris hopes that ACP goes on for another 60 years, and beyond. She would love to see some hefty grants and bequests to provide that kind of security. Thurmond Whatley, six-term Executive Director of the ACP Board, wants everyone to know that ACP is a community theater, not a private club, so if you wish to try your hand at acting, directing, costuming, lighting, or sound there is a place for you. And if you ve never seen a live play, check out the ACP website (or call the Playhouse Box Office for tickets ) Live theater opens your eyes to aspects of the human condition, said Thurmond, and you can be entertained and learn at the same time. Michael Gibbons and Heather Yeh in The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. Did you know? The Aiken Community Playhouse is a 501c3 nonprofit organization. ACP is funded by memberships, ticket sales, and a grant from the SC Arts Commission. ACP has a 99-year lease from the city of Aiken to use the facility. You can rent the entire Playhouse balcony for a single performance, complete with catering. is the website for the Playhouse. It lists the performance dates and times for each scheduled event. Sally Bradley is a staff writer for Bella Magazine. She is a retired English teacher, having taught at Aiken High School for many years. A resident of Aiken for 40 years, she holds an MA in English and dearly loves poetry. Theater-goers may recognize her from participation in theatrical productions of both comedic and serious plays at the Aiken Community Playhouse. Currently, she is a wannabe artist and enjoys traveling. Sally is married to Dr. John Bradley, and they have one son. Made in the U.S. with organic and natural ingredients. FREE of paraben, petrochemical, mineral oil, alcohol, silicone, and GLUTEN-FREE. No animal testing. 100% vegetarian, hypoallergenic, and free of artificial colors and fragrances. Offered Exclusively at (803) Zoomingrx.com BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

20 [Continued from page 11] the original ceiling. I think about the numerous merchants who stood here before us. Buzz Rich, Sallye s husband, has owned the building since around He purchased it from Deborah Brooks, wife of the late Patrick Brooks, who purchased it from the Deaton family about One of the Deaton family members is a Croft descendent. Reflection Like many of Aiken s historical buildings, the Croft Block remains functional and vibrant. More than a century has passed since its beginning, yet it remains a presence on Laurens Street. Daily commerce and activity leave little time to reflect on the history of the building and on the man who made it possible. Yet this handsome building continues to honor him, his family and those who have shared this address. Various sources were used in the preparation of this article with references found to Crofts Block, Croft Block and the Croft Building. For simplicity, Croft Block was used consistently. Anna Dangerfield is a freelance writer whom readers will recognize from her long association with BELLA Magazine. She has also been published in other secular and religious magazines. Anna has a BA in English, a BS in Pharmacy, and is a volunteer with Mental Health America of Aiken County. She and her husband have three sons, two daughters-in-law and two grandsons with whom they enjoy travelling and spending time at their beach home on the South Carolina coast. Sertoma Invites Walkers for Hearing Health in Celebrate Sound Event Vicki Snow, administrator on the Celebrate Sound committee, stands with Jean Schwalbert, who is chairing the event for Palmetto Sertoma. Celebrate Sound! Don t Walk in Silence, sponsored by Aiken s Palmetto Sertoma Club, will benefit the hearing-impaired through funds raised by walking. A national event, it will be held locally at the Village at Woodside on Saturday, October 11. Walkers can register for the event by going online to the website at aiken. Cost is $20 and includes a T-shirt and hot dog lunch if registration is completed by September 21. Participants are encouraged to obtain sponsors for their efforts. Registration begins at 9 a.m., and the walk commences at 10 through the woodsy trails close to the Village at Woodside, 1419 Silver Bluff Road. The serious Superstar Walkers can register for $100 to show their support, said Jean Schwalbert, who is chairing the event. And Virtual Walkers can raise money from home by donating $20. Even Virtual Walkers get a T-shirt, according to Jean. First Time in National Event This is the first year that the local club has participated in the national event. Money raised in the Celebrate Sound walk will be split with the national Sertoma organization. It will be spent nationally to raise awareness of communication and hearing disorders and also grant scholarships to college students for hard of hearing and deaf students and also to students who pursue graduate degrees in speech-language pathology or audiology. Some of the national money goes to nonprofits that provide hearing healthcare and educational programs for hearing health. Sound Systems in Aiken Schools The other half of the funds raised will be used locally. Up until this year, Palmetto Sertoma has worked in various ways, such as selling Christmas greenery, to earn money for its pet project: sound systems for school classrooms in the Aiken County School District. Since 2001, the club has purchased 70 sound systems which have been installed at 16 different schools. The purpose of the sound systems is to amplify the teacher s speaking voice to children in classrooms that are not acoustically well designed. In addition, some teachers have been awarded a sound system because their health has been jeopardized by having to raise their voices in order to be heard by the students. Each sound system costs close to $1,000. The club also maintains the systems. The sound systems greatly improve the learning capabilities of students with hearing loss while creating a more effective learning environment for every student, explained Jean. Teachers within the school district apply for the sound systems by filling out forms to show how a sound system would benefit the students. Her Hearing Aid is a Piece of Jewelry Hearing loss is the third most common health problem in the United States. Bonnie Culbertson, a new member of Palmetto Sertoma, is an advocate for hearing-impaired children. I work with teachers to understand how to relate to their students who have hearing challenges, said Bonnie. Hearing-impaired herself, she explained that she wears her hearing aid like a piece of jewelry. You learn to let people know you hear but don t always understand. Some people just talk louder, but that isn t the answer. They don t understand that there are some pitches or blends of sounds that don t come through. For example, I can t hear high pitched sounds, so sometimes in teaching, it s difficult to hear a child. Recently, she assisted a teacher deal with a high-pitched squeal coming from a child s hearing aid. Celebrate Sound! Don t Walk in Silence will feature food, entertainment, displays on hearing health, plus games and face painting for children provided by the South Aiken Serteen Club. Used hearing aids will be collected and will be refurbished for those in need of them. FACTS ABOUT HEARING LOSS 40% of the population is directly touched by hearing loss. 50 million people in the USA suffer from some sort of hearing loss. 30% of peple over age 20 have a hearing loss. One in every 3 people over the age of 65 has some level of hearing loss. Over age 75, the ratio is one in two. A recent study at Johns Hopkins showed that hearing loss is often linked to falls, hospitalization, and diminished physical and mental health and also the increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer s. 30% of elementary students have an inner ear infection during each school year, often causing hearing issues and some loss. 75% of the school day involves listening. 20 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

21 Is now online at Frank Davis In The Morning Tony B In The Afternoon...and Carolina Beach Music All Weekend Long! BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

22 by Betts Hunter Gatewood To Bribe or Not to Bribe? They have been called bribes, incentives, deals, trade-offs, (fill in your word here). We all know what I am talking about - that bargaining chip you use to get your child to do what you want him to, eat what you want him to, say what you want him to, etc. What do you think of this strategy? Is it effective, fair, character building, or is it too much like training an animal, too behavioristic, too manipulative? To paraphrase Thomas Phelan, author of 1,2,3, Magic, when we are raising young children it is similar to taming a wild animal! At the risk of insulting my and your offspring and grands, I agree with this assessment. Young children are selfish, immature, and do not care what is good for them as long as it tastes, feels, and looks good. This is not much different from many other animals. To help them over this lack of maturity and judgment, we have to make many decisions for them. There are also times when their own decisions will not harm them, make them sick, or affect their character in a negative way, and we can allow them to make these decisions for themselves to learn valuable lessons. When the decision is not super crucial, but we know they will benefit more if they make the one we want them to, that s when a bribe, incentive, etc. just might be an effective strategy. The adult world certainly uses incentives or bribes all the time, as in: Two for the price of one. Be one of the first 25 customers and win a free prize! An accident-free driving record reaps lower insurance costs. End-of-the-year bonus for top salesmen/ women. So if they work for us, why not use them with our children at appropriate times? Let s look at some examples: 1. You are taking a long car trip. You know it will take seven hours. Seven dollar store treats could be wrapped in tempting paper to be opened one at a time every hour IF they have followed your ground rules for the trip: no hitting siblings, no screaming, no pulling sister s hair, etc. 2. You are trying to train your toddler to use the potty. Why not have a jar of M&M s in sight and he gets one every time he uses it? This is a treat he does not usually get, and I know from experience that after he is trained he will stop asking and getting excited over this novelty. 3. Teaching manners is slow going. You are working on polite conversations with adults and do not want to hear the huh? - yeah answers. Every time your child answers respectfully, you put a marble in a jar and when the jar has 10 marbles he/she gets a trip to dollar store or another small treat. The bribes above are not huge, expensive, or difficult to carry out. They get a child s attention, add some fun to the training, and are just enticing enough to tempt most children into adjusting their behavior and language to please you. When the child does not respond, you do not badger, nag, lecture, or preach. You just quietly put the incentives away and they will get it. Too many emotional words can sabotage attempts at reasonable, effective parenting, whereas quiet removal of treats and other incentives will speak loud and clear. Have fun trying your own ideas as you continue working to shape respectful, cooperative, and responsible children. Betts Hunter Gatewood is a National Board Certified school counselor with 28 years experience in elementary and middle school counseling. She holds an EdS degree from USC and has authored or co-authored four books on school counseling strategies and activities. She and her husband are the proud parents of three adult children and have four granddaughters and a grandson. 22 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

23 Good Sense Medicine by Zoom Heaton Why Is It So Hard to Lose Weight When Your Hormones Are Not Balanced? Are you between the ages of 35 and 55 and having trouble losing weight no matter what you do? Are you eating less and less and exercising more and more and wondering why the number on the scale isn t reflecting the hard work you ve put yourself through? There are some major players in the weight loss war, and by nurturing and creating balance in the body, you can win this war by losing!! Let s look at the key players: Insulin, a vital hormone produced by the pancreas, is the most important hormone in the control of energy production. Thyroid hormones are vital in controlling metabolism. Cortisol and DHEA are stress hormones produced by your adrenal glands in response to fight or flight. Estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone, female sex hormones. Insulin Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas in response to a meal. It allows the body to process glucose (a form of sugar) into energy which fuels all of the body s functions. However, in the case of insulin resistance, the cells don t respond to the insulin messenger and the glucose is prevented from entering the cells. Many experts believe that insulin resistance develops in response to a diet that is high in carbohydrates, especially simple carbohydrates such as those found in white bread, candy, cakes, cookies, and other highly refined foods. The pancreas in turn reacts by producing even more insulin which opens excess fat cells. But since the cells have essentially closed their doors to the glucose, the additional insulin doesn t do any good. This becomes a vicious cycle of an overabundance of insulin secretion in response to meals. Insulin resistance contributes to weight gain because the body s cells, now starved for the glucose that they can t absorb, fail to produce energy leading to feelings of exhaustion. In response, the body signals the individual to eat more, and especially causes it to crave the carbohydrate-rich foods that used to produce nearly instant energy. The carbohydrates lead to the production of more glucose, more insulin, and more fat cells! Thyroid Thyroid dysfunction may be the hidden cause of weight gain. The thyroid gland is one of the largest and most important glands of your body s hormonal system. This gland secretes two hormones T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine). These hormones play a role in numerous vital functions, one of which is metabolism, the conversion of oxygen and calories into energy. When the thyroid is underactive, a condition known as hypothyroidism, it produces an insufficient amount of these hormones, which slows your metabolism, making it more difficult for your body to burn calories. This means that even if you watch what you eat, your body is less able to convert calories into energy. Those unused calories end up adding inches to your waistline. Slowly over time you can gain up to 20 pounds without even realizing it. Furthermore, once you decide to lose those unwanted pounds, your lowered metabolism makes it much more difficult to shed weight than it used to be. Cortisol and DHEA Stress is the name of the game in this new age society with tight deadlines, picking up and dropping off children to their various sports and extracurricular activities, paying a stack of bills, or just overexercising to keep weight under control. Your body is biologically hardwired to protect itself against various stressors, and it is able to do so because of two hormones produced in the adrenal glands-cortisol and DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone). When you are stressed, an adequate amount of DHEA allows your body to increase its production of cortisol, which gives you more energy, better immunity, and higher tolerance for pain. However, problems arise when you experience a significant amount of stress for an extended period of time, or chronic stress. Elevated cortisol is beneficial in the short term since it activates the metabolism of fats and carbohydrate for quick energy and keeps your blood sugar level stable. Over time, high amounts of cortisol can lead to sleep disturbances, increased blood pressure and cholesterol, irritability, sugar cravings, insulin resistance, and an energy deficit, among other health issues. On the other hand, prolonged stress ultimately results in decreased DHEA, since your body cannot produce enough to keep up with the level of stress you re experiencing. This results in an overall hormonal imbalance and creates feelings of depression. The combination of low DHEA and high cortisol increases your body s fat storage, stimulates appetite, slows metabolism, and decreases muscle mass. Excessive stress also influences where this fat is stored on your body the abdominal area. Medical research has shown that not only is abdominal weight harder to lose, but it is also the area of greatest concern insofar as health risks are concerned. These health risks include diabetes and heart disease among other serious medical conditions. Sex Hormones As women transition into menopause, estrogen and progesterone levels rise and fall unevenly during this time. As your body winds down its reproductive phase and heads toward menopause, estrogen production really starts to decline. As your ovaries produce less estrogen, your body seeks it from other sources and your fat cells are the primary source. Since fat cells can manufacture estrogen, your body works harder to convert calories into fat. Unfortunately, the more fat you have, the slower your metabolism becomes. Unlike muscle cells, fat cells don t burn calories efficiently. The body ends up storing more fat than it used to and those unwanted pounds begin to accumulate. Most of this weight comes on gradually during perimenopause and typically settles around the abdomen. Progesterone levels also decrease during menopause. Lower levels can create water retention and bloating. Testosterone, an androgen (male hormone), produced in a much smaller quantity in females, is critical for maintaining memory, increasing metabolism, decreasing excess body fat, and increasing muscle mass and tone. When these levels drop, your body produces less muscle, experiences a slowdown in metabolism, and stores food as fat more easily. To add insult to injury, if cortisol levels increase at this time (due to stress), you will store more fat, lose muscle mass, and increase the chances of insulin resistance. As you can see, weight gain is a multifactorial issue and hormones play a major role in weight control. Your appetite and your body s ability to burn fat are regulated by a host of body chemicals and physiological processes. Get your blood sugar tested and thyroid checked to be sure things aren t amiss there creating the unwanted weight gain. Get your hormones and cortisol levels checked to see if you re off balance due to perimenopause or menopause and need adrenal support. Keep in mind that sex hormones are active in saliva and tissues so saliva testing is appropriate to help with hormone balance and better weight management. Saliva testing for hormones and cortisol are available at TLC Medical Centre pharmacy. Also, blood nutrition, a blood analysis program designed to look closer at your nutritional deficiencies or hidden underlying reasons for weight gain and other health issues, is also available at TLC Medical Centre. Zoom Heaton is the owner of TLC Medical Centre Inc., an Independent Community Pharmacy and Medical Equipment facility located at 190 Crepe Myrtle Drive off Silver Bluff Road. A pharmacist, she is a graduate of the University of South Carolina. She is a Certified Diabetes Educator and is certified in Immunization; she is also the chief compounding pharmacist at Custom Prescription Compounders, LLC, inside TLC Medical Centre, Inc., specializing in Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy and Women s Health. Saliva testing is available at TLC/CPC. Call or visit nooneshoerx.com for more information. BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

24 Nutrition by Cynthia F. Catts, RD, LD, Nutrition Therapist Health: the Greatest of Human Blessings It has been well established that weight reduction, healthy eating and physical activity are important factors in preventing diabetes. One of my recent clients, a woman, aged 55, had been diagnosed as pre-diabetic by her general practitioner. She came to me to see if she could ward off the diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes. Like a lot of my other clients, she was taking an oral hypoglycemic agent, a statin and an acid reducer. She was 38 pounds overweight, worked long hours, had no time for exercise, and did not cook. She was also sleep deprived. She had a strong family history of diabetes and heart disease. By implementing integrative nutrition therapy, I helped her to understand that she could slow down or even reverse the trend toward full blown diabetes. I referred her to a personal trainer who got her moving, and over the course of several months, her health and lifestyle changed for the better. She no longer experiences gastric reflux, has no need for oral hypoglycemic agents and she and her physician are experimenting by cutting her statin dosage in half. She lost 30 pounds in a year and has decided that It s time to work a little less, and cook and play a little more. I ve outlined the Naturopathic Food Rules that my client followed. Avoid grain flour Consume protein at every meal and snack Eat more fruits and vegetables than anything else Eliminate trans fats completely Increase consumption of plant fats Include nuts and seeds daily Cook more, eat out less A Naturopathic Food Plan for Preventing Diabetes A sample menu looked like this: Breakfast Two free range eggs cooked in extra virgin olive oil, tomato slices, plain Greek yogurt with slivered nuts, seeds and berries Lunch Large salad with black beans, avocado, seeds and nuts on top; homemade dressing that includes lemon juice or vinegar, extra virgin olive oil or grapeseed oil, garlic and herbs, fruit on the side Dinner Large piece of broiled wild American salmon or halibut, assorted grilled colorful vegetables, quinoa (or other grain) pilaf Snacks Tree nuts, seeds, fruit, raw vegetables, hummus, dark chocolate Beverages Coffee, herb and green teas, water, wine For more information about improving health while losing weight, Cyndi may be reached at or at Check out her website at A licensed Clinical Nutrition Therapist practicing in Aiken, Cyndi Catts, RD, LD, sees clients who desire individualized programs to address weight reduction, metabolism measurement, menopause issues, cholesterol and triglyceride-lowering, blood pressure management, and diabetes management, in addition to eating disorders, anti-inflammation, and cancer prevention. Self-referred patients are welcome, as are referrals from medical personnel. Cyndi is a graduate of Florida State University in Food and Nutrition and has done graduate work at (now) Augusta State University. A longtime contributor to BELLA Magazine as a nutrition columnist, Cyndi can be reached at and for appointments. Delivering Smiles for Over 30 Years! Aiken Obstetrics & Gynecology Associates (803) University Parkway Suite 1550 Aiken, SC James F. Boehner, MD Robert D. Boone, MD Oletha R. Minto, MD Jessica L. Keller, DO Andreina Angle, RNC, WHNP Janet Powell, MSN, WHNP 24 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

25 BUSINESS DIRECTORY Restaurant at Rose Hill H Fantastic Service & Ambiance H Friday Night Live Music H Delicious Food H Weekend Grill Menu also Available For chef-quality taste MARK TAYLOR AND ASSOCIATES, LLC Ruby Masters Ask me about aging into Medicare The Tailor Shop Alterations of all types Vilva Bell owner Park Ave., Aiken, SC Hours: Tuesday Friday / 9am 5pm Celebrate the Year of the Horse with Aiken s own collection of horse tales.. Nights of Horseplay is available locally and at Amazon.com. See Room Inn and Cottage 3 Catering Venues Fabulous Weddings Book Your Holiday Party Now Undergoing Renovations Downtown Aiken Cottage for Rent 531 Palmetto Lane Call for details Cynthia F. Catts, RD Nutrition Therapist Weight Reduction Menopause Issues Cholesterol & Blood Pressure Lowering Eating Disorders One-on-One Counseling Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment! Woodside Executive Court in Aiken, SC BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

26 United States Polo Association - National Youth Tournament Series New Bridge Polo & Country Club May 25, 2014 Jack McLean Wesley Bryan announcing game Hope Arellano and Tess Pimsner Hope Arellano, Malia Bryan, Jack McLean, and Nicolas Galvan Hope Arellano Malia Bryan Pinky with Malia and Wesley Bryan Tess Pimsner Tristan Hurley, Mason Sease, Tess Pimsner and Eliza Limehouse TOP 50 HOTELS IN THE WORLD Travel + Leisure TOP 100 HOTELS IN THE WORLD Condé Nast Traveler The Quintessential Southern Experience 100 COLLETON AVENUE SW AIKEN SC THEWILLCOX.COM BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

27 The Farmers Market in the Alley Every Thursday in the summer 5 to 7 p.m. Trae Ferry with Rebecca Winans of Noble Breads Bruce and Terri Butler Ashley Havird and Lindsey Asbill Carolyn Cushman of Oak Wind Farms and Nancy Smith Ellen Looper and Matthew Looper visit Cooper s Apiary booth and Jeff Cooper Donna Vernier and Pam McAteer with Aimee Kirkland of Simple Times Produce Kelly Reynolds with daughters Anna Brice and Elizabeth Grace Doris Smith and Bernice Mackie flank Stephen and Alexandrea Kneece of Watsonia Thea McDermott of Dog Treats sells Don Ralon a bag of snacks BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER

28 Pink Ribb n Tea WE RE HONORED TO INVITE YOU TO A F r ee Tea Party! Guest Speaker: Cecil Herrin, Breast Cancer Survivor: A Male Perspective Thursday, October 9, 2:30 p.m. AIKEN TECHNICAL COLLEGE GREGG-GRANITEVILLE STUDENT ACTIVITIES CENTER GYM Join us to celebrate breast cancer survivors and their amazing caregivers! In addition to delicious refreshments, you will enjoy: Free gift bag Door prizes Health screenings provided by the University of South Carolina-Aiken Breast self-examination instruction provided by ARMC s Women s LifeCare Diagnostic Center Breast cancer information tables by Aiken Technical College nursing students Health information from local organizations Plus WJBF-TV s own Jennie Montgomery will serve as our emcee! Reservations are required. Please call or reserve online at: R.S.V.P. by Thursday, October 2. Physicians are on the medical staff of Aiken Regional Medical Centers, but, with limited exceptions, are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Aiken Regional Medical Centers. The hospital shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. 28 BELLA MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2014

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