Josiah Henson Special Park Schematic Design October 12, 2012

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1 Schematic Design October 12, 2012

2 Assumptions In order to plan for the visitor s interpretive experience and storyline, it is essential to imagine the visitor flow. As such, we chose to work with the preferred circulation plan that emerged during Preliminary Design (pictured on following page). It is also important, at this phase, to make decisions and assumptions about collections requirements (objects, documents, and artifacts) that might be on display in the museum experience. This is necessary so we may define physical space needs and begin cost planning. As such, initial collections requirements are identified during Schematic Design. A final collections list should be crafted by the end of Design Development, which is our next phase. Exhibit Interpretive Outline During Schematic Design the Exhibit Interpretive Outline is a DRAFT outline of the storyline. As this is refined and approved, definition of the exhibits themselves will begin to take shape. At times, even in this early phase, we will suggest exhibits along with storyline as way of an example to show what we imagine might make the best experience for the visitor. Please note that at this point, it is the storyline that is most important; the specifics of which exhibit technique is used to tell the story (is it a touch screen or a graphic?) will be defined by the end of the next phase. Interpretive Messages (to be carried throughout the exhibit experience): A 2010 Master Plan defined a vision for five main interpretive program themes. During schematic design these themes are expressed as exhibit elements that will define the collective experience. The bubble diagram that is provided herein illustrates this thematic organization and suggests the sequence that the stories will unfold, from the Introductory Theater at the new visitor center through the outdoor exhibits and into the Riley House, and finally into the log kitchen museum exhibits. In all of these spaces, we will prompt guests through interpretive exhibits to reflect on these themes and take-away the educational messages through a lasting impression. These include interpreting (as taken from the Master Plan): Josiah Henson, his life as an enslaved man in Montgomery County, Maryland. Josiah Henson s experience on the Isaac Riley plantation. The history of the Riley family as a slave holding family, the history of the plantation, its architecture, its landscape and its crops which drive the economy of slavery, and the archaeological evidence that tells us about this past. Josiah Henson s early life as an enslaved person and that of other enslaved people. A close look at family, spirituality and especially the childhood of the enslaved. Josiah Henson s work and living conditions as an enslaved person. His leadership, trustworthiness, responsibilities on the farm, opportunities for travel and independence, and his punishments received while enslaved, and resistance to his enslavement. Josiah Henson s path to freedom and emancipation. His attempt at self-purchase, his escape, his role on the Underground Railroad, other free Black communities he encountered, and manumission. Finally, Josiah Henson s influence, over time, in literature, history, stereotypes, and myths. Specific examples will be drawn from the work of Harriet Beecher Stowe and slave narratives. And, an examination of the origin of the derogatory term Uncle Tom and its historical relationship to the novel Uncle Tom s Cabin and Reverend Josiah Henson. october

3 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, 2012 Facility Plan Vision: Interpretive Program Themes Spirituality Maryland slaveholding family Archaeology Family Childhood History of plantation architecture & landscape I. Isaac Riley Plantation II. Early Life of Enslaved People Punishment & Resistance Slave Narratives V. Myth, Literature, History, & Stereotypes Rev. Josiah Henson Slave Experience in Montgomery County III. Work & Living Conditions Travel & Independence Harriet Beecher Stowe Underground Railroad Escape IV. Freedom/ Emancipation Self-Purchase Leadership & Responsibility Free Black Communities Manumission October

4 Site Circulation As visitor s begin the exhibit experience, imagine entering a Visitor Center in a newly constructed, beautiful building. Inside guests can get tickets, peruse the shop and participate in light interpretation that will offer a sense of what the exhibit experience is about. A sit-down theater provides guests with a multi-media video presentation, approximately 5-8 minutes in length. The media presentation will use film and motion graphics to present who Josiah Henson was and his fit in the broad context of American history and slavery on plantations, particularly those in Maryland. As guests exit the theater they can move to the outdoors and begin to follow a meandering path that winds across what remains of the Riley plantation, which is where Josiah Henson lived as an enslaved person. To provide transition, a portal provides a walkthrough experience that is build reminiscent of slave quarters. It makes the cognitive switch for visitors between the present day and the past, and begins a story immersion. III. Outdoor Exhibits Continuing along the path guests find a series of outdoor exhibit clusters, each set in the landscape which is shielded from the neighbors with greenery, and that promote learning about plantation life. With exhibits about farming to an archaeological dig that provides evidence from the past, these outdoor opportunities offer places for learning. Upon reaching the Riley house, visitors step inside to discover a variety of exhibit experiences that offer a powerful and lasting impression of Josiah Henson s life. From large-scale interactive timelines to audio that allows Henson come to life through narrated quotes from his autobiography, the indoor exhibits resonate in a manner that provides an overview of his entire life and how he impacted the institution of slavery after he found freedom along the Underground Railroad. Back outside, guests loop around the house and enter a working Log Kitchen. While 1850 log walls post-date Henson s time, archaeology has revealed at least three earlier earth floors that may date to his time on the plantation. Inside exhibits will feature stories from slaves and explain how the space was used. II. Visitor Center/ Introductory Theater IV. Indoor Exhibits After exiting the Log Kitchen guests are again outside and discover two more outdoor exhibits, one focused on the history of the house and the other, the experience Henson had when he returned to the house a free man, much later in life. I. Wayfinding Exhibits october

5 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, 2012 Conceptual Diagram of Exhibit Locations Josiah Henson s timeline... along path with seating Archaeological Excavation project name / owner JOSIAH HENSON SPECIAL PARK PROJECT Farming on the plantation exhibit interpretation OLD GEORGETOWN RD ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND Rockville, Montgomery County, MD seal / stamp Main House exhibits: Life of Josiah Henson Log Kitchen: Slave Life project team Portal : Introduction to Josiah Henson s life Introductory Theater/ Visitor Center Kitchen Garden Architect: LSC Design Inc 1110 East Princess Street York, PA Exhibit Designer: Experience Design 355 Congress Street Boston, MA Civil Engineer, Landscape Architect: Site Resources, Inc Jarretsville Pike Pheonix, MD Surveyor: A. Morton Thomas Parklawn Drive, Suite 400 Rockville, MD Structural Engineer: Keast & Hood Co M Street NW, Suite 610 Washington DC MEP Engineer: Century Engineering, Inc Gilroy Road Hunt Valley, MD Lighting Designer: Bruce Dunlop Lighting Design LLC 1134 York Road, Suite 200 Lutherville, MD Environmental Consultant: Eco-Science Professional, Inc. P.O. Box 5006 Glen Arm, MD revisions no. date description project north History of the house exhibit interpretation See Plan 2011, LSC Design, Inc. - All Rights Reserved. These plans are the property of LSC Design, Inc. Any use or reproduction of these plans, in whole or in part, without the written permission of LSC Design, Inc. is forbidden. date project mgr KPR project no. SRI PROJECT NO drawing set PRELIMINARY DESIGN drawing title CONCEPTUAL LAYOUT PLAN sheet no. C-2.01 October

6 Exhibit Outline 0.0 Wayfinding Exhibits and Informational Exhibits Dotted along the path from the Wall Local Park parking area to the site, and from White Flint Metro Station along the sidewalk if possible, wayfinding will guide visitors to the. At the park, wayfinding exhibits will take a slightly different form and rather than guiding guests to the park, they will provide direction through the park itself and, at times, provide operational information. For example, exhibit 0.1 will provide information such as hours of operation, perhaps an informational bulletin board, etc. 0.1 Informational Signage Experience Goal: Provide information such as a map, hours of operation, etc. This purely informational piece will be located outside the Visitor Center Experience. 1.0 Introduction (to be provided in the media experience) Provide an overview to the entire exhibit experience, both indoors and out. 1.1 Experience Introduction: What s at? Experience Goal: Provide an overarching overview to the through a graphic exhibit for guests. This exhibit should serve to create an orientation for those who may choose to pass by the Introductory Theater. It will explain what is offered inside and outside on the s grounds and make connections to Newport Mill. Interpretive Message: The is a place to discover the story of the man who lived here, on the Riley Plantation, for most of his life as an enslaved person, raised a family, escaped to freedom, helped others escape to freedom, and became an influential figure in American history. 1.2 Media Experience Experience Goal: Provide an overview to the in a media theater with a digital production of no more than 8 minutes in length and which serves up to 30 guests. Interpretive Message: The is a place to discover the story of the man who lived here, on the Riley Plantation, for most of his life as an enslaved person, raised a family, escaped to freedom, helped others escape to freedom, and became an influential figure in American history. 2.0 Outdoor Exhibits A series of outdoor exhibits set the stage for an in-depth exploration of Josiah Henson inside the house. These exhibits will begin to introduce what life was like on the farm for the enslaved. The use of Rev. Henson quotes in some of the interpretive elements is suggested as it will bring his voice to life and help provide a connection for visitors. 2.1 Portal Experience Goal: To immerse guests in the storyline and to provide a sense of place for the visitor experience. This portal, which is reminiscent of a slave quarter, offers a walk-through experience which will effectively transport guests to the nineteenth century and provide a transition to the Riley Plantation. Interpretive Message: An introductory graphic panel located before the portal exhibit will provide context and brief introduction while the portal structure itself will be made of rustic and reclaimed wood. Graphic content should address the time period, introduce the Riley plantation and, address plantations in Maryland as a whole. 2.2 Rev. Josiah Henson, who was this man? -outdoor exhibit Experience Goal: Offer an exhibit that allows guests to gain an overview of Rev. Josiah Henson s life. This site will be open to the public at all hours and as such some visitors may enter the grounds without first experiencing the introductory theater. This brief exhibit can provide context to the other outdoor exhibits. Interpretive Message: The is a place to discover the story of the man who lived here, on the Riley Plantation, a farm owned by a slave holding family. He grew from boy to man, raised a family, had a leadership role on the farm, and experienced the work conditions of a slave. Eventually he found freedom through escape along the Underground Railroad and he in turn, helped others find freedom in Canada. 2.3 Farming- outdoor exhibit Experience Goal: Offer an exhibit that allows guests to begin to explore the history of the Riley Plantation and make connections between Henson and his role in farming. Interpretive Message: Focus on what was being grown on the plantation, the landscape of the Riley Plantation during Henson s time, the role of the enslaved in farming, and the economic reliance that slave holding families, like the Rileys, placed on the enslaved workforce.... raised on the farm, the wheat, oats, hay, fruit, butter... Henson 2.4 Kitchen Garden- outdoor graphic Experience Goal: Offer an exhibit that lets visitors discover more about the Riley Plantation and the living and work conditions of those enslaved on the plantation. Interpretive Message: Near the Riley house, guests might look upon a small garden that represents what the former Riley kitchen garden could have looked like. A graphic can provide an opportunity to discover what was grown there and why, making connections between how the enslaved used the farm/grounds to prepare food for the Riley family. It is also an example of work conditions. 2.5 Archaeological Excavation- outdoor graphic Experience Goal: The has offered opportunities for archaeological exploration that provide insights to history. This interpretive element would offer guests the chance to observe or participate where an excavation might have occurred and explain october

7 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, 2012 how archaeological evidence provides evidence about the past. Interpretive Message: Archaeology goes beyond verifying documents or oral histories; instead it provides a contextual matrix for the history of the site and interpretation. 2.6 Architecture and History of the House- outdoor graphic Experience Goal: Provide a location for interpretation of the architectural history of the house. Interpretive Message: Located on the front of the house, along the visitor path, is a brief look at the history of the house, what it looked like during Henson s years and the subsequent renovations designed by Lorenzo Winslow. 3.0 Indoor Museum Exhibits: As guests enter the museum (inside the house) they find that the collective museum experience will utilize a host of exhibit techniques to tell the story of the man, Reverend Josiah Henson. This is a story that explores who he was; an enslaved man in Montgomery County, who eventually found freedom. Throughout the exhibit experience, it is imagined that the use of quotes, each drawn from his autobiography (it is his 1849 autobiography which is referenced and cited herein) will provide guests with a clear understanding of who Henson was. While the quotes will be only one exhibit technique, it is an exhibit design goal to integrate quotes, as a primary source citation, to bring Henson s story alive. There are many possible ways to integrate Henson s voice by quoting him: impactful and visual graphics that intersperse quotes, visitor-controlled audio that enables guests to hear a narrated excerpt, devices that trigger the playing of narrated quotes as guests come near an exhibit element, and other means. It is important to keep in mind that if recorded narrated components are desired in some instances, sound can be well-controlled through a variety of exhibit techniques. 3.1 Introduction to Josiah Henson: Who Was He? Experience Goal: Engage guests and prepare them for the museum experience, including a timeline. Interpretive Message: While this is an introductory exhibit, and its message will therefore be brief, it is intended to provide an overview of Josiah Henson. It should with brevity tell the guest that Josiah Henson lived here on the Riley Plantation as an enslaved person. He grew up here, became a Christian, raised his family, was entrusted to manage the farm and travel unsupervised, and even face the opportunity to choose freedom or forego it, when travelling through free states. Eventually Henson did chose to escape to freedom but only after introspection and deliberation. Henson went on to become a leader in the Underground Railroad movement and to form Dawn Settlement in Canada. 3.2 Overview of the Life of Rev. Josiah Henson Timeline Experience Goal: Provide an overview of the milestones of Henson s life, provide a context for how it fits into the larger context of American history, and to explore his enduring influence. Interpretive Message: Born in 1789 in Charles County, Maryland, Josiah Henson lived a life as an enslaved man, husband, father, author, minister, and abolitionist. Dying in 1883, his life work centered around the experiences he had as an enslaved man in Montgomery County. During Henson s life he was instrumental in bringing about change, as is evidenced in history and literature. 3.3 How Do We Know? Experience Goal: Encourage viewing of various editions of Henson s autobiographies. Graphics might accompany the books and explain the interpretive message, terminology and definitions of key words used throughout the exhibit. Interpretive Message: Our modern day understanding of the story of Josiah Henson s life the enslavement of children, his early life on the Isaac Riley Plantation, his life as an enslaved man, work/living conditions, his escape to freedom all stems from Henson s own accounts. We turn to his own autobiography, written in three iterations (one dictated) for insight and understanding. By looking to these writings we can draw a vivid picture of his life. 3.4 Where Did It Happen? The Riley Farm Experience Goal: Much of Henson s life as an enslaved person takes place as property of Isaac Riley, owner of this farm. This exhibit introduces this slave holding family. Interpretive Message: The Riley farm was owned by a slave holding family that gained great economic benefits from slavery. It s important to understand the role of this family and their farm as it shaped Henson s life tremendously and it helps to understand Montgomery County s role in a border state. 4.0 Josiah Henson: An Enslaved Man This theme area and its associated exhibits make Henson s life vivid to the guest. The use of quotes is significant and it will help his voice come to life. 4.1 Earliest Recollections: Childhood of an Enslaved Person Experience Goal: Immerse guests in Henson s story with the powerful and moving recollections of his childhood/family life. Interpretive Message: Josiah Henson experienced slavery as a brutal institution from his earliest recollections as a child. He recalled it as destructive and devastating to his family. Henson, like other enslaved children, were expected to work and endure the inhumanity of family loss, separation, and loneliness. October

8 My brothers and sisters were bid off one by one, while my mother, holding my hand, looked on in agony of grief, the cause of which I but ill understood at first, but which dawned on my mind, with dreadful clearness, as the sale proceeded. My mother was then separated from me, and put up in her turn. She was bought by a man named Isaac R., residing in Montgomery county, and then I was offered to the assembled purchasers. My mother, half distracted with the parting forever from all her children, pushed through the crowd, while the bidding for me was going on, to the spot where R. was standing. She fell at his feet, and clung to his knees, entreating him in tones that a mother only could command, to buy her baby as well as herself, and spare to her one of her littlest ones at least. Will it, can it be believed that this man, thus appealed to, was capable not merely of turning a deaf ear to her supplication, but of disengaging himself from her with such violent blows and kicks as to reduce her to the necessity of creeping out of his reach, and mingling the groan of bodily suffering with the sob of a breaking heart? Yet this was one of my earliest observations of men; 4.2 Work and Living... Early Years Experience Goal: Provide insight to the life and conditions of the enslaved. Interpretive Message: Josiah Henson was subjected to an excruciating hard life experienced through difficult work and living conditions, enforced through threat of punishment and violence. His recollections provide us with an understanding as to the nature of his daily life. He endured long days, hard work, and sparse living conditions. From this emerged a strong and influential man who was assigned to superintendent of the farm. My earliest employments were, to carry buckets of water to the men at work, to hold a horse-plough, used for weeding between the rows of corn, and as I grew older and taller, to take care of master s saddle-horse. The meals were two, daily. Our lodging was in log huts, of a single small room, with no other floor than the trodden earth, in which ten or a dozen persons--men, women, and children--might sleep, but which could not protect them from dampness and cold, nor permit the existence of the common decencies of life. There were neither beds, nor furniture of any description-- In these hovels were we penned at night, and fed by day; here we were the children born, and the sick--neglected. Such were the provisions for the daily toil of the slave. I grew to be a robust and vigorous lad, and at fifteen years of age, there were few who could compete with me in work, or in sport--for not even the condition of a slave can altogether repress the animal spirits of the young negro. I was promoted to be superintendent of the farm work, and managed to raise more than double the crops, with more cheerful and willing labor, than was ever seen on the estate before. 4.3 The Riley House...House Layout Experience Goal: Located next to the sneak peak viewing window into the Log Kitchen (and the sleeping loft for the enslaved) this exhibit might address how the house was laid out and how it appeared before the 1930s renovation. Perhaps this is a flip book, one where guests can turn the pages and discover how the house appeared at different points in time. Interpretive Message: With special attention paid to underscoring the fact that the log kitchen was added after Henson left the property, the kitchen does provide an example of the work conditions of slaves and archaeological evidence that earlier kitchen floors existed in the same location. This exhibit will explain the layout of the house and how interior conditions of the house differed from that of the log kitchen and even from the conditions slaves experienced on the farm. 4.4 Spirituality and Henson Experience Goal: Highlight the role of spirituality in Henson from age 18 onward. Interpretive Message: At 18 Henson heard a sermon that had a powerful impact on his own spirituality. This important moment shaped his future as a spiritual leader. This exhibit could offer a look at not only what shaped Henson but how spirituality guided him through the remainder of his life even leading him to become a Reverend himself. This is also a place to discover the role of Henson s mother in shaping his spirituality and character. When I arrived at the place of meeting, the services were so far advanced that the speaker was just beginning his discourse, from the text, Hebrewsii.9; That he, by the grace of God, should taste of death for every man. This was the first text of the Bible to which I had ever listened, knowing it to be such. He said the death of Christ was not designed for the benefit of a select few only, but for the salvation of the world, for the bond as well as the free; In the course of the three years from 1825 to 1828, I availed myself of all the opportunities of improvement which occurred, and was admitted as a preacher by a Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 4.5 Henson as Overseer and Caretaker. An exploited enslaved man. Experience Goal: Promote critical thinking and discussion. Interpretive Message: While Henson was in some ways rewarded for his strength, intelligence, and commitment with the job of superintendent of the farm, Riley was continuing to exert his control as slave owner and exploiter by assigning this job. Riley saved on the cost of employing a white overseer and benefited from more cheerful workers overseen by Henson, a fellow enslaved person. This exhibit will examine this story while underscoring the role of leadership and responsibility in Henson s life. Additionally, while Henson was often charged with caring for Riley during evenings out -- a task he admittedly took on with enthusiasm -- he ultimately paid a heavy price for defending Riley, with a beating that permanently maimed him for life. 4.6 Henson s Travels... Moving Through Free Land Experience Goal: Make a personal connection... what would you do? Glimpse at a slave pass, manumission papers, and maps of the path Henson traveled with Riley s slaves and his own family. Interpretive Message: Moving through states that endorsed slavery was frightening. Moving through states where blacks could be free, could be a baffling experience for someone like Henson who held the moral conviction that running to freedom was simply wrong. He intended to buy his freedom one day, so the urging to run was somewhat inconceivable to him. Would it be to you? This exhibit explores the moral, emotional, and intellectual conflict he faced while travelling at different stages in his life. It also explores Henson s personal travels -- both local and more distant -- and how they compared to october

9 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, 2012 that of other enslaved people. At Cincinnati, especially, the colored people gathered round us, and urged us with much importunity to remain with them; told us it was folly to go on; and in short used all the arguments now so familiar to induce slaves to quit their masters. From my earliest recollection, freedom had been the object of my ambition,... an stimulus to gain and to save. No other means of obtaining it, however, had occurred to me, but purchasing myself of my master The idea of running away was not one that I had ever indulged. 4.7 Freedom for Henson or A Trick by Riley? Experience Goal: Illustrate the unyielding power of slavery. Interpretive Message: Henson s initial pursuit of freedom was prompted by the visit of a Methodist preacher in 1828, who urged him to pursue purchasing his freedom. After much negotiation a deal was struck and a price set for Henson to buy his freedom. However, not long after did Henson realize that behind his back Riley had greatly increased his sale price to a nearly unattainable fee, cheating Henson out of this opportunity to gain his freedom. This trick speaks to the cruel work and living conditions of the enslaved....it was not till the 9th of March, 1829, that I received my manumission papers in due form of law. I began to perceive the trick that had been played up on me, 4.8 Plantation Layout Experience Goal: Engage guests in an interactive to discover how the Riley Plantation was formerly laid out as compared to what remains today. Alongside will be an archaeological specimen case that aids us in understanding the past, through the evidence offered in the objects. Interpretive Message: The Riley Plantation was a working farm, where enslaved people did the work. The farm changes its appearance over time as Isaac met economic challenges and of course, time passed and we have reached the modern day. 4.9 New Orleans Experience Goal: Increase the tension in the Henson story. Interpretive Message: Living and working conditions on the Riley Plantation continue to degrade through Henson s life, culminating with a trip to New Orleans that ultimately is intended for the sale of Henson himself. The storyline should reflect on Henson s fading belief in his ability to attain freedom through self-purchase and inner-debate over escape. The storyline will also examine his personal spiritual struggles at this difficult time. My wife and children accompanied me to the land, where I bade them an adieu, which might be for life, and then stepped into the boat... After all that I had done for Isaac and Amos Riley, after all the regard they had professed for me, such a return as this for my services, such as evidence of their utter disregard of my claims upon them, and the intense selfishness with which they were ready to sacrifice me, at any moment Escape! Rev. Henson s escape to freedom was not only dramatic but also representative of a journey that so many others took before and after him. Not long after his own personal journey, Henson became a conductor on the Underground Railroad, helping many on the road to freedom. In Canada, Rev. Henson helped offer hope for new life at the Dawn Settlement with the establishment of an industrial school for former slaves. Exhibits should present this story to fulfill guests understanding of Henson s significant life and work which was on-going, long after he left the Riley Plantation. 5.1 Henson s Escape! Experience Goal: Provide a sense of the peril, drama, and emotional turmoil as well as physical challenges faced by Henson as he made his way toward Canada. Interpretive Message: Rev. Henson chose to escape to freedom once he realized there was no other way to attain his freedom and keep his family safe and alive. A difficult journey for he and his family, he in turn helped others in later years along the same path and provided enormous support in Canada to those who found freedom there. Canada was often spoken of as the only sure refuge from pursuit, and that blessed land was now the desire of my longing heart. Infinite toils and perils lay between me and that haven of promise, enough to daunt the stoutest heart; but the fire behind me was too hot and fierce to let me pause to consider them. 5.2 Conducting on the Underground Railroad and Canada Experience Goal: Provide insight, for visitors, into Henson s life after he escaped to Canada and his enduring impact on slavery in the United States as well as the establishment of new lives in Canada. Interpretive Message: Henson s commitment to aiding others through continued work on the Underground Railroad lasted for many years and provided help and hope for numerous enslaved people. 6.0 Literature, History, Stereotypes, and Myths To provide an opportunity to reflect on fact, fiction, and the interweaving of the two, this exhibit area will prompt thinking about history and how we know what happened. October

10 6. Literature, History, Stereotypes, and Myths Experience Goal: Make a connection between Henson s autobiography and other literary pieces, such as Uncle Tom s Cabin and The Key to Uncle Tom s Cabin. Also, explain the motivation behind the writing of Henson s autobiography. Interpretive Message: The real lives of slaves, like Henson, have shaped the writing of many fictional works. Today our understanding of historical institutions and events come from a compilation of sources, some real and some fictional. It is important to separate the differences between fiction and first-person accounts and discuss the origin of the derogatory term Uncle Tom and its historical relationship to the Reverend Josiah Henson. 6.2 Reflections Experience Goal: Reflect on the material learned and discovered with family or friends in a seating area offered just before exit. Perhaps copies of his autobiography (in multiple editions) are available for viewing. Interpretive Message: Henson led a full and rich life, one that has left an enduring impression of courageousness, leadership, spirituality, and morality on our current history and legacies. **Note, visitors exit to the outdoors. Wayfinding elements help guide guests along the circulation path and make choices about where to go next. The ideal next step in the visit is to follow the path to the Log Kitchen. There, guests can again go inside and find more museum exhibits. 7.1 Slave Voices Experience Goal: Let guests hear voices of the enslaved through audio. Interpretive Message: Slave narratives tell us much about the life of a slave. This exhibit could serve to carry forward the voice of the slave and share with visitors a moment that might be heard around the kitchen. 7.2 Log Kitchen, History and Architecture Experience Goal: Let guests discover more about the architectural qualities of the kitchen. Interpretive Message: This exhibit might explain how the enslaved were made to use the kitchen. 8.0 Architectural Sidebar Information Experience Goal: Let visitors know about the original spatial features and character of the house that Josiah Henson would have experienced inside and out. Interpretive Message: The 1930s renovation of the house (instead of a wholesale demolition or destruction of existing rooms) preserved important history because it largely retained the size and configuration of early 19th century rooms. 7.0 Log Kitchen After guests leave the main house with clear understanding of Josiah Henson, who he was, his life at the Riley Plantation, and his impact on North American history, they are offered another opportunity to enter an exhibit space the Log Kitchen. It is an immersive space that is similar in architecture to what would have been found around Henson s time. Since slaves did live in the kitchen, working to prepare food for the Riley family, it is a wonderful example of slave life even though it is not an example of where Josiah Henson lived. Inside, demonstrations and permanent exhibits should highlight how the Log Kitchen was used and bring forward the voice of the enslaved that might have been heard working in here, many years ago, to better understand what their lives were like. The restored loft area will show off where the enslaved would have lived/slept. Ideally, the flooring will look much like dirt, giving a holistic, realistic sense of what the kitchen appeared like and a portion of the earlier earth floors could be revealed through plexiglas. This area will often be staffed by docents/demonstrators but, when it is not, it will stand on its own as a museum experience. october

11 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, 2012 Plan View of Indoor Exhibits -represents Thematic Zones and potential exhibit locations *not all exhibit techniques are determined in this phase. This is ONLY a space planning document. This does not represent any exhibit design. Locations are general, not in any way fixed or final. No windows or doors will be covered. ADA issues will be considered and design developed in the next phase October

12 Schematic Design Sub-phase process and concepts On the following pages a series of exhibit ideas represent the schematic design level thinking about how we might express the storyline. We illustrate ideas that have various price-points, which is part of the planning process. In the next phase, a budget direction will be given and, all exhibits will be developed. For general planning purposes we have assumed option A most costly, B middle, and C least costly. october

13 1.2 Media Experience Experience Goal: Provide an overview to the in a media theater with a digital production of no more than 8 minutes in length and which serves up to 50 guests. Interpretive Message: The is a place to discover the story of the man who lived here, on the Riley Plantation, for most of his life as an enslaved person, raised a family, escaped to freedom, helped others escape to freedom, and became an influential figure in American history. Content Outline: In keeping with the interpretive message, the media should present: -Who was Josiah Henson? -an enslaved man who lived and work on this property -a man who was extremely spiritual and hard working -a man who provides a window for us onto the lives of the enslaved-- from childhood to adulthood. -a man who followed the Underground Railroad to escape slavery. -What was his life like here on a Maryland plantation as an enslaved person? -the Riley plantation, work effort and lifestyle of the enslaved -other Maryland plantations -How did he shape the institution of slavery after he found freedom? -life in Canada -involvement in the Underground Railroad -slavery in the US Option A -Developed with a high production value, re-enactments and multiple actors, motion graphics and illustrations, narration. Edited in Final Cut Pro and After Effects. Multiple curved, semi-wrap around screens and 3 projectors, special effects lighting and dynamic text on 2 additional projectors. Option B -Developed with a high production value fewer re-enactments and some actors, motion graphics and illustrations, narration. Edited in Final Cut Pro and After Effects. One wrap around screens and one projector, one dynamic text projector. Option C -Developed with a high production value fewer re-enactments and some actors, motion graphics and illustrations, narration. Edited in Final Cut Pro and After Effects. One screen and one projector. october

14 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, Portal Option A Introductory graphic, quotes embedded in the pavers, and proximity sensors embedded in the pavers, which when triggered by a passing visitor cues an audio response of recorded narration which allows visitors to hear select excerpts and quotes from Henson s autobiography providing glimpses into his life. In addition, the walk through portal, which is constructed in such a way to be reminiscent of the quarters in which slaves lived, will have quotes and images interspersed throughout. Ing erilis alit, quam vulputat Josiah Henson Ing erilis alit, quam vulputat ad magna augue mod exercin cillan ulpute ver I began to perceive the trick that had been played upon me, October

15 2.1 Portal Option B A walk through portal, constructed in such a way to be reminiscent of the quarters in which slaves lived, will have quotes and images interspersed throughout. It also includes an introductory graphic and quotes embedded in the pavers. Josiah Henson Ing erilis alit, quam vulputat ad I began to perceive the trick that had been played upon me, Ing erilis alit, quam vulputat ad Ing erilis alit, quam vulputat ad magna augue mod exercin cillan ulpute ver sit lam voloreet ad october

16 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, Portal Option C This largely open air, somewhat deconstructed slave quarters is intended to serve as a portal for guests. As guests move through they find 5-6 quotes from Henson s autobiography. Includes an introductory graphic. Olobor iliqui exeraesectem num elisit at incil in I began to perceive the trick that had been played upon me, October

17 2.2 Rev. Josiah Henson, Who Was This Man? - outdoor exhibit Option A For guests who may not explore the Introductory theater, this exhibit provides important orientation as to who Henson was. Imagined as a series of exhibit components, this experience may be placed along an outdoor path. It includes seating of stone perhaps granite and a timeline of Henson (brief) etched in the stone and alongside a graphic panel. october

18 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, Rev. Josiah Henson, Who Was This Man? - outdoor exhibit Option B For guests who may not explore the Introductory theater, this exhibit provides important orientation as to who Henson was. Located along an outdoor path, this exhibit is imagined as a 3 long interpretive exhibit rail made of hardwood and a phenolic resin graphic. Phenolic resin offers durability for outdoors and longevity. October

19 2.2 Rev. Josiah Henson, Who Was This Man? - outdoor exhibit Option C For guests who may not explore the Introductory theater, this exhibit provides important orientation as to who Henson was. Located along an outdoor path, this exhibit is imagined as a 3 long interpretive exhibit rail or, a 2.5 wide by 4 tall interpretive panel. Both might be made of wood with an interpretive graphic panel attached to the surface. october

20 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, Overview of the Life of Rev. Josiah Henson - Timeline Option A A three screen media display, powered by an Apple tower, provides high resolution display of a dynamic timeline. Using motion graphics, moving text, inset video, narration, music, and more, this captivating piece might run 2-3 minutes. It will provide a sense of Henson s life and make connections to other events in American history that provide context and a deeper meaning. Josiah Henson Dunt ing Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, ea faccum zzrilis amcommy Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, vullam, secte tisl ilisi. Orper acip er iliquam- After all that I had done for Issac and Ames Riley, after all the regard they had professed for Josiah Henson October

21 3.2 Overview of the Life of Rev. Josiah Henson - Timeline Option B A large panoramic graphic creates a sense of Henson s life while three smaller inset video screens provide looping digital media to bring the piece to life. Recommended as a silent piece to avoid the conflict between screens. As a singular experience, this exhibit will provide a sense of Henson s life and make connections to other events in American history that provide context and a deeper meaning. Igna conum veliquam dit aci After all that I had done for Issac and Ames Riley, after all the regard they had professed for Igna conum veliquam dit aci ex euis Igna conum veliquam dit aci ex euis delit ip exero exercil iure commy nim quiscing et, cor accum delit vel After all that I had done for Issac and Ames Riley, after all the regard they had professed for october

22 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, Overview of the Life of Rev. Josiah Henson - Timeline Option C A large, panoramic graphic provides the setting for a timeline that conveys the story of Henson s life and makes relevant connections to American history. Josiah Henson Dunt ing Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, ea faccum zzrilis amcommy Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, vullam, secte tisl ilisi. Orper acip er iliquam- After all that I had done for Issac and Ames Riley, after all the regard they had professed for October

23 3.3 How do we know? Option A This illustrates a highly engaging exhibit experience where guests might explore the exhibit How Do We Know? This exhibit creates a space where Henson s autobiography seems to literally come to life and takes the exhibit form. Upon the book pages static graphic provide the copy and text while passages slowly take form as words seem to be inscribed before the visitor s eyes and move across the page through projected media. Alongside the oversized book, cases provide display opportunity for various editions of Henson s autobiography, giving guests the opportunity to view the real thing. How Do We Know? My wife and children accompanied me to the land, where I bade them an adieu, which might be for life, and then stepped into the boat... After all that I had done for Isaac and Amos Riley, after all the regard they had professed for me, such a return as this for my services, such as evidence of their utter disregard of my claims upon them, and the intense selfishness with which they were ready to sacrifice me, at any moment... october

24 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, How do we know? Option B This option illustrates a slightly less dramatic version of Option A, utilizing the same form and intent, but foregoing the use of the projected words that form passages on the pages. Instead, printed static graphics form the beautiful pages and provide the interpretive messaging. How Do We Know? My wife and children accompanied me to the land, where I bade them an adieu, which might be for life, and then stepped into the boat... Tue vel in ex eraesequat laorem voluptat nim nostrud tis nulputem incidunt acipit, consent iureet iuscinit, velenim ipit nonsectem zzrilit in henim vero ex esenit vel ut nit, quis nit luptat vel ullutatio con verit lorperos After all that I had done for Isaac and Amos Riley, after all the regard they had professed for me, such a return as this for my services, such as evidence of their utter disregard of my claims upon them, and the intense selfishness with which they were ready to sacrifice me, at any moment... Tue vel in ex eraesequat laorem voluptat nim nostrud tis nulputem incidunt acipit, consent iureet October

25 3.3 How do we know? Option C A less illustrative version of How Do We Know? then what is pictured in the previous two versions, this elegantly designed and straightforward interpretive exhibit highlights the content and the messaging through graphics and display opportunities. How Do We Know? After all that I had done for Isaac and Amos Riley, after all the regard they had professed for me, such a return as this for my services, such as evidence of their utter disregard of my claims upon them, and the intense selfishness with which they were ready to sacrifice me, at any moment... Tue vel in ex eraesequat laorem voluptat nim nostrud tis nulputem incidunt acipit, consent iureet october

26 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, The Riley House... House Layout Option A Located at the viewing window that allows guests to peer into the Log Kitchen from the main house, this touchscreen might encourage visitors to explore the previous architectural history of the house and the log kitchen as it related to working and living conditions of enslaved people. Josiah Henson Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in Josiah Henson Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iure- October

27 4.3 The Riley House... House Layout Option B Located at the viewing window that allows guests to peer into the Log Kitchen from the main house, this graphic panel with an attached flip book that allows for deeper discovery and hands-on exploration, might encourage visitors to explore the previous architectural history of the house and the log kitchen as it related to working and living conditions of enslaved people. Flip book to be added to the interpretive graphic rail. Josiah Henson Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in Josiah Henson Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iure- october

28 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, The Riley House... House Layout Option C Located at the viewing window that allows guests to peer into the Log Kitchen from the main house, this straightforward graphic panel allows guests to explore the previous architectural history of the house and the log kitchen as it related to working and living conditions of enslaved people. Josiah Henson Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in Josiah Henson Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iure- October

29 Schematic Design 4.4 Spirituality and Henson Option A Imagined as a very emotional exhibit, this space is designed to connect guests to the story of Henson s spirituality as an enslaved man and how he came to be shaped by spirituality. The exhibit might be a journey of Henson s spirituality and composed of a series of images, spiritual songs, phrases, and quotes that are together presented on a series of scrims by projectors that fill an elegant church window. The experience is orchestrated by the guest s selection at the kiosk enabling the visitor to self-direct the content area explored. He said the death of Christ was not designed for the benefit of a select few only, but for the salvation of the world, for...was admitted as a preacher by a Conference of the Methodist EpiscopalChurch Spirituality and Henson october

30 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, Spirituality and Henson Option B Imagined as a very emotional exhibit, this space is designed to connect guests to the story of Henson s spirituality as an enslaved man and, how he came to be shaped by spirituality. The exhibit might be a journey of Henson s spirituality and composed of a series of images, spiritual songs, phrases, and quotes that are together projected on a single surface that is metaphorically representing a church window. He said the death of Christ was not designed for the benefit of a select few only, but for the salvation of the world, for The nearby kiosk offers a flip book (not technology but physical manipulative) where guests can explore the story. Spirituality and Henson October

31 4.4 Spirituality and Henson Option C Imagined as a very emotional exhibit, this space is designed to connect guests to the story of Henson s spirituality as an enslaved man and how he came to be shaped by spirituality. The exhibit might be a journey of Henson s spirituality and composed of a series of images, phrases, and quotes that are together printed on a surface and fill a church window. Nearby a kiosk offers a graphic opportunity for interpretation. He said the death of Christ was not designed for the benefit of a select few only, but for the salvation of the world, for Spirituality and Henson october

32 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, 2012 Concept for Exhibit 4.8 One option 4.8 Plantation Layout Interactive Located near a real window guests can look through through this interactive window to see different vistas that may have been present from the same viewing spot, through time. Easy to move shutters change the images for visitors. Nearby, a case with archaeological specimens gathered from the site provide evidence of different activities that might have taken place through time. October

33 5.1 Henson s Escape Option A As guests approach this exhibit, proximity sensors will trigger a silent display of projected quotes that will creep across the floor, swirl around visitors feet and inch across the mural to form phrases. Each quote will be from the autobiography which will gently mingle across an impressive mural that will itself have copy and interpretive text telling the story of Henson s escape with his family along the Underground Railroad. The silence of the piece is meant to underscore the silence needed to travel safely... Canada was often spoken of as the only sure refuge from pursuit, and that blessed land was now the desire of my longing heart. Infinite toils and perils lay between me and the haven of promise, enough to daunt the stoutest heart; Lent vent volore delessi sciniscidunt lortisi tate vel illam, but the fire behind me was too hot and fierce to let me pause to consider them. Lent vent volore delessi sciniscidunt lortisi tate vel illam, Canada was often spoken of as the only sure refuge from pursuit, and that blessed land was now october

34 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, Henson s Escape Option B As guests approach this exhibit, proximity sensors will trigger a silent display of projected quotes from the autobiography which will gently mingle across an impressive mural that will itself have copy and interpretive text telling the story of Henson s escape with his family along the Underground Railroad. The silence of the piece is meant to underscore the silence needed to travel safely... Canada was often spoken of as the only sure refuge from pursuit, and that blessed land was now the desire of my longing heart. Infinite toils and perils lay between me and the haven of promise, enough to daunt the stoutest heart; Lent vent volore delessi sciniscidunt lortisi tate vel illam, but the fire behind me was too hot and fierce to let me pause to consider them. Lent vent volore delessi sciniscidunt lortisi tate vel illam, October

35 5.1 Henson s Escape Option C Graphic copy will be printed on mural. Canada was often spoken of as the only sure refuge from pursuit, and that blessed land was now the desire of my longing heart. Infinite toils and perils lay between me and the haven of promise, enough to daunt the stoutest heart; Lent vent volore delessi sciniscidunt lortisi tate vel illam, but the fire behind me was too hot and fierce to let me pause to consider them. Lent vent volore delessi sciniscidunt lortisi tate vel illam, october

36 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, 2012 Concept for Exhibit 4.6 and 6.1 One concept 6.1 Slave Voices Located in the Log Kitchen Via proximately sensors or an interactive touch mechanism, guests can trigger a brief narrated audio experience that provides insight and understanding to the life of the enslaved by allowing them to hear their voices. 4.6 Manumission Papers Displayed in a case and alongside a lens visitors can move the lens over a reproduction document to have the language and handwriting translated into more understandable, contemporary English. October

37 Options for Graphic Treatment *represented is a proposed look and feel illustrated Sign Elements Option 1 Sample Interpretive Rail Typography Title ABCDEFGHIJK LMN OPQRST U V WXY Z abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Josiah Henson Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, vullam, secte tisl ilisi. Orper acip er iliquamcorer inci elit at atueraessis dolortinit lore duis dolore euguer sustin et wis augiame tumsan volobore del dolesto diate dipit ulla faci bla consent ullaorem vulputpat. Ut praessed tem aliquat lum voloboreetue volobor sumsan ut vel eum dolortie facinim ilit autpating et, venisi te consed ting eu facillaor sustin ullamcore tie del illam iuscilit praessim zzrit wissequam ad dolor susto conse te min er sequam augait aute con ulluptat inis adip ea autat at laore dolorti scilis nullum quis exer ip eugait loreetue ercipit laorem Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, vullam, secte tisl ilisi. Orper acip er iliquamcorer inci elit at atueraessis dolortinit lore duis dolore euguer sustin et wis augiame tumsan volobore del dolesto diate dipit ulla faci bla consent ullaorem vulputpat. Ut praessed tem aliquat lum voloboreetue volobor sumsan ut vel eum dolortie facinim ilit autpating et, venisi te consed ting eu facillaor sustin ullamcore tie del Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, vullam, secte tisl ilisi. Orper acip er iliquamcorer inci elit at atueraessis dolortinit lore duis dolore euguer sustin et wis augiame tumsan volobore del dolesto diate dipit ulla faci bla consent ullaorem vulputpat. Ut praessed tem aliquat lum voloboreetue volobor sumsan ut vel eum dolortie facinim ilit autpating et, venisi te consed ting eu facillaor sustin ullamcore tie del illam iuscilit praessim zzrit wissequam ad dolor susto conse te min er sequam augait aute con ulluptat inis adip ea autat at laore dolorti scilis nullum quis exer ip eugait loreetue ercipit laorem aliquat. Duisit lan ero Headers ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTU VWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Body Text ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTU VWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz october

38 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, 2012 Sign Elements Option 2 Sample Interpretive Rail Typography Title ABCDEFGHIJK LMN OPQRST U V WXY Z abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Josiah Henson Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, vullam, secte tisl ilisi. Orper acip er iliquamcorer inci elit at atueraessis dolortinit lore duis dolore euguer sustin et wis augiame tumsan volobore del dolesto diate dipit ulla faci bla consent ullaorem vulputpat. Ut praessed tem aliquat lum voloboreetue volobor sumsan ut vel eum dolortie facinim ilit autpating et, venisi te consed ting eu facillaor sustin ullamcore tie del illam iuscilit praessim zzrit wissequam ad dolor susto conse te min er sequam augait aute con ulluptat inis adip ea autat at laore dolorti scilis nullum quis exer ip eugait loreetue ercipit laorem Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, vullam, secte tisl ilisi. Orper acip er iliquamcorer inci elit at atueraessis dolortinit lore duis dolore euguer sustin et wis augiame tumsan volobore del dolesto diate dipit ulla faci bla consent ullaorem vulputpat. Ut praessed tem aliquat lum voloboreetue volobor sumsan ut vel eum dolortie facinim ilit autpating et, venisi te consed ting eu facillaor sustin ullamcore tie del Dunt ing ea faccum zzrilis amcommy nim vendrem quat nulla facil dolor sequisl enibh eugiamet iurero consecte diat in esse moluptat. Ostionse dit adiat. Pis duissequam, vullam, secte tisl ilisi. Orper acip er iliquamcorer inci elit at atueraessis dolortinit lore duis dolore euguer sustin et wis augiame tumsan volobore del dolesto diate dipit ulla faci bla consent ullaorem vulputpat. Ut praessed tem aliquat lum voloboreetue volobor sumsan ut vel eum dolortie facinim ilit autpating et, venisi te consed ting eu facillaor sustin ullamcore tie del illam iuscilit praessim zzrit wissequam ad dolor susto conse te min er sequam augait aute con ulluptat inis adip ea autat at Headers ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTU VWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Body Text ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTU VWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz October

39 Interpretive Message Planning and Design This document is a guideline document to be used to guide the remainder of our Facility Plan progress and post-facility Plan, Final Design and Production/Construction phases of work. During Final Design phase, exhibit label copy will be written and graphic production will take place. We recommend that the copy be composed with a standard museum-going audiences in mind as is the typical professional standard. What this means is that museum copy will be written for the general public, which is an 8th grade reading level. Paragraphs no longer than 50 words. Headlines should be engaging and brief. We also encourage headlines to be communicative, and not simply catchy. In this way the casual viewer will learn something even if they do not reach the paragraph that follows. Headlines should make sense if they are the only things that are read. All copy should be designed to engage, educate and make a personal connection if possible. We advocate the integration of fun facts written on a slightly simpler level to inspire and engage a younger audience. These are often incorporated on the larger graphic and inset in a way that is visually exciting. example of an effective title example of an effective headline and brief introductory copy example of provocative question as title, to engage in a deeper, second tier level of learning. examples of phenolic resin installed outdoors in the Tucson desert. To inspire an audience with a deep knowledge of the content area, we recommend the integration of some multi-media that is layered in depth and offers information that is a bit more complex. Graphics Graphics are not fully designed during facility planning. During the Final Design phase material selections shall be based on these guidelines. We advocate that the graphic design utilizes a typography designed to consider the expectations of ADA and Universal Design standards. In essence this means large type, easy to read color choices, and brevity in the copy. We have provided recommendations for graphic design in this drawing set. Our recommendations are a result of careful consideration of standards and the development of an aesthetic that reflects the storyline. As materials are selected, they should be made based on the institutional needs. We presume that this means a 10-year minimum life span for outdoor exhibits and for indoors. Indoor exhibits are often changed and it may become the desire of the institution to have a system where graphics can be readily removed and changed, should there be a desire. At this stage, we would recommend phenolic resin graphics for outdoors and second surface acrylic graphics and/or applied vinyl for indoors. It is also possible to perform direct to substrate printing on sintra or aluminum, in locations where that is appropriate (murals for example). examples of second surface vinyl applied to acrylic (lower image of the bottom right with faces is dts on aluminum) october

40 f, f Schematic Design Lighting Developing a good lighting plan is critical for a number of reasons and in terms of timing, its creation typically follows the development of final exhibit plan. Lighting should be developed in a manner that promotes effective viewing, enhances special effects and exhibit drama and, is used in a manner that is consistent with conservation needs of documents and objects. Examples of final lighting that is effective in its ability to illuminate exhibit objects and copy while also considering conservation needs. Storage The project s architectural design should provide approximately one-third the total exhibit space square footage footprint for exhibit storage support space. october

41 Prepared by Experience Design, october 12, 2012 General Recommendations for Interpretive Signage on Site--Not to Scale *Note, we are very flexible in these locations based on grade and vegetation needs. portal interpretive rails October